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ASIAN STUDIES CONFERENCE JAPAN

Index

ASCJ Executive Committee

Contact the organizers: Asian Studies Conference (ASCJ) c/o Institute of Asian Cultural Studies, International Christian University 3-10-2 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181





Conferences
Inaugural conference
1998 conference
1999 conference
2000 conference




Conference venue
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1999 June 26 conference
Room 307

4. Individual Papers on Ethnicity and Cultural Categories

Chair: Professor Motomitsu Uchibori, Professor of Anthropology, Tokyo Gaigo University

1) Ed Friedman, University of Wisconsin-Madison. "Transcending the East-West Binary"


This paper seeks to show that all great cultures contain all the things that are usually othered as east or west (depending on who is doing the othering), and that indeed the intended target is often some internal tendency that another wishes to label alien, and therefore, both for better and for worse, we are all in this together and can learn much from each other. Indeed we all do best when we are open to learning from each other. Therefore, the best way ahead is to explode the east-west opposition.

2) Wayne K. Patterson, St. Norbert College. "Futei Senjin: Japan and 'Rebellious Koreans' in Hawaii, 1905-1925"

When Japan established the Protectorate over Korea in 1905, the 7000 Koreans who had emigrated to Hawaii began what was to be a forty-year movement for Korea's independence from Japanese colonial rule.Japan kept a close watch over the activities of this nationalist movement because it had the potential for terrorism against Japanese interests and also because it had the potential to garner the sympathy of the government of the United States. These two potentialities mirrored to a certain extent the cultural nationalist and the radical nationalist approaches found inside Korea at that time.   These two also provided the impetus in part for the splintering of the nationalist movement in Hawaii.For two decades, as Hawaii's Koreans actively opposed Japan, the Japanese Consulate-General in Honolulu spied on the Koreans to assess the strength of the movement.This effort increased markedly after the outbreak of the March First Movement in 1919 (Korean:Samil Undong;Japanese:Sannichi Undo). But by the end of the Taisho period, the Japanese had become convinced that it had little to fear from Hawaii because of the factional divisions between the Kungminhoe and the Dongjohoe.The United States also came to a similar conclusion, and as a result refused to recognize a Korean government in exile.While in this sense, the nationalist movement, of which Hawaii's Koreans played a major part, was a failure, it did serve to energize thenationalist sentiments of Koreans against the Japanese.

3) Igor R. Saveliev, Niigata University,"Immigrants and Guerrillas: Japanese and Korean Diasporas in the Early Twentieth Century Russia"

This paper examines documents recently gathered in the Historical State Archives of Russia and the Japan Diplomatic Records Office in order to analyze the place of Japanese and Korean diasporas to Eastern Siberia in the Far Eastern Policies of Russian and Japanese Empires. It gives a short overview of the seasonal sojourn and migration of these ethnic groups to the territory of Amur and Maritime Districts in 1860s - 1920s and focuses on Korean ethnic associations. Some of these associations were supporting the struggle of Korea's guerilla armies against Japanese colonial regime in Korea. Their attacks on Japanese troops from the Russian territory became a matter of diplomatic negotiations of Russia's and Japan's Foreign Offices in 1912-1914. The Russian Government, interested in the maintaining the status quo with Japan, promised to fulfill Japan's requests for the deportation of Korean guerillas. However, Priamur Governor-General Gondatti, who was aware ofthe Korean immigrants' riots in Siberia, contradicted the measures by the Russian Foreign Minister Sazonov, directed towards the prohibition of guerilla activities. Finally, the negotiations between Japan's Foreign Office, Russian Government and the Priamur Governor-General, analyzed in the paper, resulted in the prohibition of the activities of Anti-Japanese associations and deportation of their leaders.

4) Zha, Daojiong, International University of Japan, "'Chinese Capitalism' and Globalization: Competing Paradigms in Studying Asian Political Economy

"Chinese Capitalism" as a research paradigm has gained acceptance in the academic community for explaining the political-economic dynamism in East and Southeast Asia. But it tends to overlook the structural elements of global capitalist development and Asian governments' public policy factors that are probably as important as the cultural (i.e., Chinese or Confucian) determinants. An alternative explanation can be established by sorting out the juxtaposition of globalization, regionalism, and interdependence in the postwar period. Furthermore, ethnic Chinese business networks may not post as much of a governance problem for the various Asian nation-states as literature on "Chinese Capitalism" seems to suggest.

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