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pmjs logs for January - March 2007. Total number of messages: 97
This is an open version of the log. Email addesses have been hidden.
For recent discussions of this list, see the new PMJS listserve

* 2007 Summer Kambun Workshop on Heian Regency Materials (Elizabeth Leicester)
* Japan Historical Texts Initiative worshop at USC  (Elizabeth Leicester)
*  Call for papers: The 7th meeting of the Nordic Association for Japanese and Korean Studies  (Bjarke Frellesvig)
* A Reminder:  Early Modern Japan Network at the AAS:  The Kibyo-shi:, "Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography" in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks (Philip Brown)
*  ruten sangai ge (Lawrence Marceau)
* literacy rates (Michael Pye, David Pollack, Ross Bender, Judith Froehlich)
* Bibliographer for Asian Languages and Studies Position at Univ. of Colorado (Danielle Rocheleau Salaz)
*  Summer theatre training in Kyoto (Jonah Salz)
* Noh Training Project 2007 (Richard Emmert)
* Social Science History Association Call for submissions (Philip Brown)
* Call for Papers for a Panel on Rural interaction with the Urban through tourism (Philip Brown)
* Komonjo/Kuzushiji Workshop at Yale (Philip Brown)
* Conversion tool of Word files with old diacritical fonts (Mac) (Nobumi Iyanaga)
* Ask or help - Hangul 97 (Karin Lofgren, Joseph Elacqua, Alexander Vovin)
* Noh Performance and Workshop (Christina Laffin)
* His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun (Joseph Elacqua, Michael Watson, Kristina Buhrman, Richard Emmert, Janet Goodwin, Nobumi Iyanaga)
* International Workshop in Osaka (Hiroshi Araki)
* Book announcement: Manga from the Floating World
* ajls news/call for papers (Eiji Sekine)
* Call for Papers: Critical Feminist Biography as Translocal History (Philip Brown)
* Call for Papers AAR 2007 (Gaynor Sekimori)
* New Publication: A Cultural History of Japanese Women’s Language (Bruce Willoughby)
* A Reminder:  Early Modern Japan Network at the AAS:  The Kibyo-shi: "Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography" in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks (Philip Brown)
* [Keene Center] Next Thursday's lecture/concert: The Ancient Asian Harp Reborn (Max Moerman)
*  job opening: the University of Ghent (Andreas Niehaus)
* JAHF/PMJS: Koguryo and its neighbors (Morgan Pitelka)
* Call for papers: East Asian Studies Graduate Student Conference (U of Alberta) (Anne Commons)
* MLA call for papers (Joseph Sorensen)
* KCJS: Juliet Carpenter lecture on translation (Henry Smith)
* results of the encoding survey (Michael Watson)
* Presentation on medieval shoen (Janet Goodwin)
* help identifying subject in ukiyoe print by Kuniyoshi (Patricia Graham, Michael Watson, Joseph Elacqua)
* Another angle on Taizanfukun (Michael Jamentz)
* Query: Pre-modern postal system (Barbara Nostrand)
* origins of term banzai/wansui (Morgan Pitelka, Michael Watson, Anthony Bryant, Charles DeWolf, Alexander Vovin, Richard Emmert, Herman Ooms, Ross Bender, William Bodiford, Niels Guelberg)
* Bungo Special Interest Group (Stephen Miller, Aldo Tollini)
* A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions... (Joseph Elacqua, Jion Prosser, Michael Pye)
* Query (Peter McMillan)
* Kojiki reading (Klaus Antoni)
* Japanese Historical Text Initiative (Yoko Okubo, Ross Bender)
* Re: origins of term banzai/wansui * phonetic spellings (William Bodiford, Alexander Vovin)
* Kojiki reading (Sarah Thal, William Bodiford, Nobumi Iyanaga)
* New in paperback: Cartographies of Desire
* Classical Japanese Reader and Essential Dictionary (Michael Watson)
* Query: Pre-modern postal system (Brian Goldsmith, Janet Goodwin, Florian Eichhorn, Karin L÷fgren, Peter Shapinsky)
* Correction: AAS Panel #15, Sex, Politics & Buddhist Ideology (Janet Goodwin)
*  job announcement: Western Michigan University (Philip Brown)
*  Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan (Michel Vieillard-Baron)
* KCJS: Janine Beichman lecture on translation (Henry Smith)
* Workshop on Chuyuki with Yoshida Sanae at USC (Janet R. Goodwin)
* North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources,Multi-Volume Sets (NCC-MVS) Awards (Philip Brown)
* Two new paperback editions (Bruce Willoughby)
*  Two new books (Mikael Adolphson)
* Tokugawa Jikki (Morgan Pitelka, Michael Wert, Patricia J. Graham)
* Noh Training Project 2007 (Richard Emmert)
* Postdoc in East Asian archaeology (Janet R. Goodwin)
* Announcing Virtual Kyoto Web Site (Philip Brown)
* Traditional Japanese Literature (Michael Watson)
* A new book on the Man'yoshu (Yasuhiko Ogawa)
* Japan/Asia Papers at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting (Philip Brown)
*  SOAS Workshop May 19, 2007 (Monika Dix, Michelle Li)
* Aristocratic lineages (Brian Goldsmith, Sharon Domier, Scott Spears)
* Aristocratic lineages (Carol Tsang)
* post on new classical Chinese text (Paul Rouzer, Saowalak Suriyawongpaisal)

From: Elizabeth Leicester <___@earthlink.net>
Date: January 4, 2007 4:25:00 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  2007 Summer Kambun Workshop on Heian Regency Materials

The Project for Premodern Japan Studies in the Department of History at the University of Southern California,
in collaboration with the University of Tokyo Historiographical Institute
announces the 2007 Summer Kambun Workshop on Heian Regency Materials, July 16 – August 10, 2007 and
Pre-Workshop Kambun Tutorial Week, July 9-13, 2007

The Project for Premodern Japan Studies in the History Department of the University of Southern California announces the 2007 Summer Kambun Workshop for graduate students and faculty in premodern Japanese studies. We are pleased to announce that Professor Eiichi Ishigami of the University of Tokyo Historiographical Institute, who specializes in the history of the Nara and Heian periods, will co-lead the workshop with Professor Joan Piggott of the USC History Department. The 2007 workshop will focus on materials from the Heian Regency era (late 9th to later 11th centuries), and will consist of practice in the reading, analysis, annotation, and translation of historical texts from this era. The primary language of the workshop will be Japanese, but translation into English is also emphasized. Translations from the Workshop will be published on the USC Kambun Workshop website. Sessions will be held Monday through Friday from July 16 to August 10 in the USC East Asia Library. Applicants must have reading and spoken fluency in Japanese and they must have completed basic course work in classical Japanese. For those who have no background in either classical Chinese or kambun, we are pleased to offer a second annual Pre-Workshop Kambun Tutorial week for students who need preparatory training in reading kambun. The Tutorial will be taught by two advanced graduate students from USC who have participated in several previous Summer Kambun Workshops.

Tuition for the workshop is $1500. For those who want it, the Tutorial week tuition is an additional $400. On-campus housing will be available. Please see the application for options. Thanks to a generous grant from the Northeast Asia Council (NEAC), some fellowship assistance will be available to lessen tuition costs. However, applicants are encouraged to seek financial assistance from their home institutions.

Applications may be downloaded from the USC Kambun Workshop website at www.usc.edu/kambun.
Applications are due March 17, 2007, and registration deposits are due May 4, 2007.
For further details contact:

Professor Joan Piggott

University of Southern California. Department of History, Social Science Bldg. 168, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0034

Phone: (213) 821-5872; Fax: (213) 740-6999; email: ___@usc.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: Elizabeth Leicester <___@earthlink.net>
Date: January 7, 2007 7:46:41 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Japan Historical Texts Initiative worshop at USC

The Project for Premodern Japan Studies at the University of Southern California announces a workshop with:

Dr. Yuko Okubo, East Asian Library, UC Berkeley
"How to Use the Japan Historical Texts Initiative (JHTI) for Your Research"

Friday, February 2, 2007; 3-5 pm in the Stoops East Asian Library Seminar Room on the USC Campus.

The Japanese Historical Text Initiative (JHTI) is an electronic research tool hosted by the East Asian Library of UC Berkeley that will revolutionize research in Japanese history and literature for two reasons: (a) It will enable a researcher to search through a vast amount of source material at almost the speed of light; and (b) it will enable a researcher to see on the same screen both the Japanese original and the English translation of any word or string of words, or any character or string of characters, being studied. The workshop will include demonstrations from the various texts, and will include responses to individual research interests.

The texts included in the JHTI website include:
Kojiki (712 CE); Nihon Shoki (720 CE); Shoku Nihongi (697 to 791); Izumo Fudoki (submitted in 733); Engi Shiki (submitted to the Imperial Court in 927); ďkagami (covering the years 866 to 1027); Eiga Monogatari (covering the years 794 to 1185); Taiheiki (completed around 1371); Gukansh˘ (completed in 1219); Jinn˘ Sh˘t˘ki (completed in 1339); Tokushi Yoron (completed in 1712); Meiji Igo Shűky˘ Kankei H˘rei Ruisan (only Japanese) (Collection of Religious Orders Issued since the Beginning of Meiji); Kokutai no Hongi (Principles of Nation-Body, 1937); Lotus Sutra (Kegon-ky˘); Ofudesaki (Tenri-ky˘); Nihon Gaishi (Rai Sanyo); Meiji Bunka Zenshu; and Nihon Keizai Taiten.

Parking for the Stoops East Asia Library (EDL on the USC map) is available for $7.00 in Lot B. Enter at Gate 4 from Jefferson Blvd. at Royal St.
For further information, please contact Prof. Joan Piggott at ___@usc.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: Bjarke Frellesvig <bjarke.___@hertford.oxford.ac.uk>
Date: January 8, 2007 21:04:57 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Call for papers

CALL for PAPERS
The 7th meeting of the Nordic Association for Japanese and Korean Studies will take place in Copenhagen, 24-26 August 2007. Please see http://www.najaks.dk/ for details about sections and submission of paper proposals.
Bjarke Frellesvig

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: January 8, 2007 23:29:11 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  A Reminder:  Early Modern Japan Network at the AAS:  The Kibyo-shi:,,Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography,,in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks

A reminder that the Early Modern Japan Network will hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting in Boston on Thursday afternoon, March 22 from 2 p.m.  Please mark your calendars as this announcement will not appear in the AAS program.  We will meet in Salon D.  We have an exciting, innovative panel planned.   The full description of the panel follows.

See you in Boston!

Philip Brown
Early Modern Japan Network


“The Kibyōshi:

Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography

in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks”


Historically derided as a kind of frivolous comicbook for “women and children” of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the kibyōshi was actually an urbane genre of pictorial comic fiction for adults, characterized by its mature wit, sophisticated visual-verbal play, radical allusivity to the entire thousand-year Japanese cultural imagination (if not also to the even longer Chinese one), and, perhaps most surprisingly, edgy sociopolitical satire. In spite of much rhetoric to the contrary, the readers of the kibyōshi were primarily educated townsmen. And although some notable merchants wrote in the genre, most authors were low-ranking samurai, a fact that suggests that the many politically irreverent works served as vehicles for nominal members of the ruling elite to criticize with relative impunity (albeit under pseudonyms) their superiors—if not the very ideology of Tokugawa Japan itself.

Arguably the most widely read genre in its own day, the vast popularity of the kibyōshi is rivaled, perhaps, only by its subsequent scholarly neglect. Although interest in the genre has been growing over the past several decades even in the West, especially because of the recent “Edo boom,” this panel draws together several scholars outside Japan whose works take a fresh look, albeit from different vantage points, at this genre that epitomizes one of the greatest peaks in Japanese cultural history.

As is evident from the abstracts below, each panelist explores a different dimension of the kibyōshi: its parodies de-centering symbolic (though viewed increasingly as reified) hierarchies, thereby serving as a crucial juncture between dominant and subordinate cultures (Hirano); its alleged relation to modern Japanese manga in terms of visual-verbal conventions, readership, and erotic representation (Kern); its power as a vehicle for presenting images of the foreign—especially the Western—Other and the resultant impact on the Japanese visual regime (Screech); and its potential, in the hands of one of the period’s greatest littÚrateurs, as meaningful autobiography that can also be read against the grain of that author’s more “serious” works (Walley).

In keeping with the visual-verbal mode of the kibyōshi, each scholarly presentation takes the form not of a traditional talk, but of a documentary video.

ABSTRACTS


1. Katsuya HIRANO (Assistant Professor, Cornell University)—“Power, Parody, Kibyōshi”

              This presentation examines the political implications of parody enacted through the production and circulation of kibyōshi during the late eighteenth century in Tokugawa Japan.  This particular moment marked an extensive, circular, and reciprocal influence between the cultures of subordinate and dominant classes. Popular culture prospered through its clever and creative appropriation of discourses and images produced in high culture (parody), and high culture found it necessary—both willingly and unwillingly so—to incorporate some literary, aesthetic, and intellectual elements from popular culture into its own form. This increasing reciprocity of influence between dominant and subordinate cultures inadvertently de-centered symbolic hierarchies—the cultural configurations of power—constructed by the Tokugawa regime. I argue that it was the kibyōshi and its authors that played a central role in this extensive interaction of these two cultural spheres, and that this interaction had a destabilizing effect on cultural distinctions designed to maintain the social hierarchies of Tokugawa Japan.

2. Adam KERN (Associate Professor, Harvard University)—“‘Manga Culture’ and the Kibyōshi”

              A growing number of cultural critics in and out of Japan have begun to hail the kibyōshi as the progenitor of the modern Japanese comicbook (manga). Although the century separating the heyday of the former and the advent of the latter calls such characterizations into question, this presentation explores the relationship between the two genres by examining a number of apparent similarities often cited by the proponents of what can be termed “manga culture theory,” such as the putative use in both genres of panelization, speech balloons, speed lines, and pornography. I argue that most of these similarities turn out to be superficial—hardly evidence of some direct historical link between the kibyōshi and the modern manga. Paradoxically, however, after debunking the notion that artist Katsushika Hokusai coined the term manga, I raise the possibility that in some regards the kibyōshi may actually have been the “original” manga.

3. Timon SCREECH (Professor, SOAS, University of London)—“The Lens in the Art of the Kibyōshi”
              Kibyōshi have recently been the subject of much study, and it has become increasingly apparent how wide was the range of material celebrated in them. Kibyōshi can now be see as an integral part of Floating World culture. One repeated theme is the encounter of Japan—or of Japanese people—with the foreign. Despite the relative seclusion of the Japanese state, kibyōshi reveal that an intense debate about overseas matters was underway. Of course, given the genre, this debate often takes the form of ridicule or satire. Often too, the foreign is given less as an authentic other voice, and is more an eccho of the self.

              This presentation will consider several kibyoshi in which specifically European matters are invoked (as opposed to other kibyōshi addressing Ezo, China or the Ryūkyūs). As will be shown, mention of European inventions, such as hot-air balloons or static-electricity generators, and European sciences, such as surgery and botany, can be found scattered across many works. I shall concentrate in my presentation on one matter: discussion of lensed devices.

              Lenses could be ground in Japan from the late 18th century, but most were imported. In either case, they carried with them a foreign colouration. But the lens was also supposed to be something for lucid and objective vision. Telescopes and microscopes, as well as lensed peepboxes with hidden pictures, offered a metaphor for close, precision inspection of ones surroundings, and in the Floating World those surroundings were social.

4. Glynne WALLEY (Ph.D. candidate, Harvard University)—“ ‘So this guy from Edo walks into a teahouse in Kyoto…,’ Or, Kibyōshi as Autobiography: Bakin’s 1802 Journey to the Capital and A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West”

         In 1802 journeyman author and kibyōshi specialist Takizawa (Kyokutei) Bakin traveled the Tōkaidō to Kyoto and Osaka on one of his rare trips outside of Edo.  His experiences on the road furnished the material for two autobiographical writings: Kiryo manroku, a diary-style travelogue that circulated as a manuscript, and Saritsu udan, a cross between a travelogue and an antiquarian miscellany published in 1804.  In addition, Bakin included references to his trip in some of his kibyōshi he published in 1803.  Of these, A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West (Heso ga wakasu sayu monogatari) is the most extensively concerned with his journey, presenting itself as a collection of funny stories about things he heard or saw on his travels, done up in the style of A Companion to Remember Saikaku By (Saikaku nagori no tomo, 1699) while spoofing the title of the great Chinese classic Journey to the West (Ch. Xi You Ji, J. Sayūki, ca. 1590s).

              This presentation will focus on A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West as an attempt on Bakin’s part to fashion an explicitly autobiographical kibyōshi. I will compare his treatment of his travels here to those found in his prose travelogues, addressing the effects on these disparate works of audience expectations and generic conventions.  I will also examine Bakin’s evolving authorial persona as evident in this kibyōshi, and what the trip to the West meant for him and his writing.  Finally, I will situate this work in the context of Bakin’s other late kibyōshi, as part of his interest in kibyōshi organized around principles other than narrative.


From: Richard Emmert <___@gol.com>
Date: January 24, 2007 9:41:43 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Noh Training Project 2007

Dear List members,
I wish to again this year announce the Noh Training Project's annual summer intensive noh program in the US, from July 16 through August 3. For this, our 13th summer, we will be hosted by Indiana University of Pennsylvania in Indiana, Pennsylvania, one hour outside of Pittsburgh. Please feel free to pass this on to interested friends or students or post it where appropriate. Full information on the Noh Training Project can be seen at our website: http://www.nohtrainingproject.org/ which also has a link to photos from last summer's NTP.

Basic information follows. My apologies for cross-postings.
Rick Emmert
=============================
Noh Training Project---July 16 through August 3, 2007

The Noh Training Project, now in its 13th summer, is a three-week intensive, performance-based training in the dance, chant, music, and performance history of Japanese Noh Drama. This summer NTP will be hosted by Indiana University of Pennsylvania, one hour outside of Pittsburgh. NTP still offers the most intensive training available in the United States in the performance of noh.

As in the past, Noh Training Project 2007 will include five to six hours daily of group and private lessons in the chant (utai), dance (shimai) and musical instruments (hayashi) of noh, with twice-weekly evening viewing sessions of Noh performances on video with discussion on the history, literary and musical aspects of noh. There will be a final public recital on August 3rd.

The program is lead by director and head instructor Richard Emmert. Noh Master and internationally renowned performer Akira Matsui will again join us for the final week of training. Noh musician Mitsuo Kama will once more be giving daily individual drum lessons for the full three weeks. James Ferner will be head music assistant and lead general classes in noh music with Jubilith Moore being the head dance and chant assistant.

The rigorous program is geared particularly to those with performance training in theater, dance and/or music, but it is open to all interested persons. Applicants must send a resume and written narrative describing their interest in and reasons to study noh. Send applications to:

Noh Training Project 2007
Waller Hall
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
401 South Eleventh St.
Indiana, PA 15705  USA

Phone: 724-357-2548
Fax: 724-357-7899

For details about tuition fees and deadlines, including the early registration discounts through March, as well as housing arrangements in Indiana, PA, please see our webpage at http://www.nohtrainingproject.org/ which also has photos from last summer's NTP.

Please address inquiries to NTP 2007 producing director David Surtasky <___@nohtrainingproject.org>.

--
Richard Emmert
Artistic Director, Theatre Nohgaku (http://www.theatrenohgaku.org/)
Director, Noh Training Project (http://www.nohtrainingproject.org)
[also (http://www.iijnet.or.jp/NOH-KYOGEN/english/english31.html)]
Professor of Asian Theater and Music, Musashino University, Tokyo
(http://www.musashino-u.ac.jp/specialfeature/profile/pro_literature.html)

Home:
Hon-cho 2-27-10, Nakano-ku
Tokyo  164-0012  Japan
tel: 81-3-3373-0553
fax: 81-3-3373-4509
email: ___@gol.com
----------------------------------------------------

From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: January 26, 2007 4:44:17 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Social Science History Association Call for submissions


  Colleagues,


I forward the Social Science History Association call for paper/panel
proposals. Further information is listed at the URL at the very last
part of this message.

SSHA is one of the best venues I know of for getting to know people with
theoretical, methodological and comparative perspectives in which one is
interested. It is large enough to be very diverse, yet small enough to
really have a chance to get to know people from all over the world with
similar interests. (This is truly an international conference.)

I am particularly interested in encouraging people with Asian research
interests to participate. Although the conference has a theme, only a
portion of all panels will deal with it. Panel and individual paper
proposals on any topic relevant to the Association's concerns are very
welcome.

Please check the SSHA web site, and if you still have questions, I will
try to assist in getting answers.

Best regards,

Philip Brown
SSHA Rural Network Co-Chair
ssha-___@sbcglobal.net



  Call for Papers


      SOCIAL SCIENCE HISTORY ASSOCIATION 2007 ANNUAL MEETING: CALL FOR
      PAPERS AND SESSIONS

*“History and the Social Sciences: Taking Stock and Moving Ahead”*

(This document is also available in Microsoft Word format
<http://www.ssha.org/call_papers/SSHA_CFP_2007.doc>.)

The Social Science History Association returns to The Palmer House
Hilton <http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/hotels/index.jhtml?ctyhocn=CHIPHHH>
for its 32nd Annual Meeting, 15-18 November 2007, in Chicago, Illinois, USA.

The SSHA is the leading interdisciplinary association for historical
research in the US; its members share a common concern for
interdisciplinary approaches to historical problems. The organization's
long-standing interest in methodology also makes SSHA meetings exciting
places to explore new solutions to historical problems. We encourage the
participation of graduate students and recent PhDs as well as
more-established scholars, from a wide range of disciplines and departments.

The SSHA was founded amidst a burst of intellectual excitement about the
possibility of gaining new insights into history by utilizing social
scientific approaches and theories. At the same time the organization
reflected a rejection of the tendency in many social sciences to
privilege the present. Just as a rich palette of new research
perspectives was created in history by this movement, a whole new set of
possibilities was opened in other social science disciplines.

At the 2007 SSHA meeting in Chicago, a series of sessions will assess
how much progress has been made on these fronts in recent years and will
identify those areas where the greatest advances have taken place. Those
scholarly areas where progress has been most limited will also be
identified, and the obstacles to further advances examined in order to
plot paths to future development. Some panels will address very broad
questions, such as the state of social science history within the
contemporary historical profession and the role and status of historical
research within individual social science disciplines today. Others will
look at more limited areas, such as the state of the social scientific
study of gender history. Of interest, too, are the implications of the
rise of cultural history for the development of social scientific
approaches to history. Panels are encouraged to identify both those
forces within or across disciplines that have been slowing progress in
social science history and those approaches and studies that show the
most promise for overcoming them. As always, in addition to the sessions
organized around the special theme, other sessions will deal with the
full variety of topics of interest to SSHA members.

The SSHA program is developed through networks of people interested in
particular topics or approaches to interdisciplinary history. Paper and
session proposals should be submitted to the appropriate SSHA
network(s). Current networks, their representatives, and contact
information are listed on the reverse side. If you are not certain about
which network to send your proposal to, ask the representatives of the
network closest to your interests, or ask the program co-chairs, listed
beneath the call for papers at http://www.ssha.org/call_papers/.

----------------------------------------------------

From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: January 26, 2007 7:44:54 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Call for Papers for a Panel on Rural interaction with the Urban through tourism

A colleague at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell is interested in preparing a proposal for the Social Science History Association meeting 15-18 November 2007, in Chicago, on the theme of urban-rural interaction through tourism.   Comparative and cross-national perspectives would be most welcome.

Please contact Patrick Young, Department of History, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, phone 978 934 4276, fax 978 934 3023, e-mail ___@uml.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: January 27, 2007 8:08:26 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Komonjo/Kuzushiji Workshop at Yale

Komonjo/Kuzushiji Workshop at Yale

Professor Umezawa Fumiko of Keisen Univeristy in Tokyo will lead the annual Komonjo/Kuzushiji Workshop to be held at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale from July 15 through August 11, 2007.

Workshop course materials will be drawn from Japanese manuscripts and early printed books held at the Beinecke and will focus primarily on reading kuzushiji with an overview of hentaigana, sorobun, and the basics of kanbun.  Applications from graduate students, faculty members, educators, museum curators, and library professionals are welcome.  Further information about Workshop content, Yale University, travel to New Haven, and the application are available at Yale’s East Asia Library web site:

http://www.library.yale.edu/eastasian/events/komonjo.html

The deadline for submitting applications is March 15, 2007.

The Workshop is sponsored by the Beinecke, Yale University Libraries International Programs, and the Council on East Asian Studies at Yale and organized by Professor Edward Kamens, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures and Ellen Hammond, Curator of the East Asia Library.  Registration costs and partial subvention of housing in an on-campus suite with kitchen will be provided by Yale.  Participants are asked to secure funding from their home institutions for travel to and from New Haven and the remainder of the costs for room and board.  Those who would like to apply for scholarship assistance for travel expenses should contact Ellen Hammond (ellen.___@yale.edu).

Ellen H. Hammond
Curator
East Asia Library
Yale University

Address:
Sterling Memorial Library
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven, CT  06520-8240

Telephone:
203-432-1791 (Direct)
203-432-1790 (East Asia Library Secretary)

Fax:
203-432-8527
----------------------------------------------------

From: Nobumi Iyanaga <n-___@nifty.com>
Date: January 27, 2007 23:40:28 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Conversion tool of Word files with old diacritical fonts (Mac)

Dear Colleagues,

This is not directly related to Buddhist or Japanese studies, but I would like to draw your attention to a problem and propose a possile solution. In the old days of Classic Mac OS (I guess the situation was similar in Windows 95/98 days...), those of us who work in different fields of Asian studies, used to use some kind of special fonts to transliterate Asian languages with needed diacritical characters.  These fonts were for example Norman, Appeal, Hobogirin, etc.

These fonts were Roman one-byte fonts, with some special diacritical characters in the "higher-ASCII" range.  But with Mac OS X, we enteredthe age of Unicode; these "faked" fonts, which constituted non standard character sets/encodings are no longer recommended. They are not good for data exchange (we cannot expect that everybody has these fonts...); they are not good for searching: we cannot search in plain text for a Japanese or a Sanskrit term..., etc.

But people may have many documents written with these old fonts, and one day, perhaps they may be unable to use them (especially with the new Intel-Macs, on which we can no longer run Classic OS).  Anyway, it would be much better to convert these documents into documents using modern Unicode fonts.

I thought about this problem some years ago, when we were facing the transition to the "Unicode age", and for my own work -- all in
Classic Nisus Writer files in these days --, I managed to write some macros for Nisus Writer that can solve it: please see my web page:
<http://www.bekkoame.ne.jp/~n-iyanag/researchTools/diacriticalfontsandunicode.html>

But there are many more people who use other word-processors for their work; I think especially of those who work with MS Word.  These files should be converted one day, or it will be probably impossible to use them...

I could manage to write an AppleScript droplet which can convert these files; in fact, I could test it only with very few files: two simple files using Norman, and an even more simple file using Appeal.  But I think/hope that it will work with other fonts as well.  The supported fonts are:
Appeal
BharatiTimes
Hobogirin
ITimesSkRom
Minion-Indologist
MyTimes
Norman
NormanSk
TimesCSXPlus

I wrote a web page presenting this droplet, from which you can download it:
<http://www.bekkoame.ne.jp/~n-iyanag/researchTools/convert_word_diacritical_f.html>

If you are interested, please try this droplet, and please let me know if you encounter any problems (I would appreciate if you could send me your files...).

-- By the way, I guess that Windows users should have the same problem, and I think/hope that the Perl script which is "embedded" in my droplet should work for Windows MS Word files as well.  But of course, I am not sure at all.

Best regards,

Nobumi Iyanaga
Tokyo,
Japan

P.S.  Apologies for cross-posting.

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Karin Lofgren" <___@swipnet.se>
Date: January 28, 2007 4:07:58 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Ask or help - Hangul 97

Dear All,

I have a colleague who has run into a serious problem and I wonder if I may ask if there is anybody in this list that might be able to help out. My colleague has stored very important research information on a computer where the OS was Hangul-97. I will not try to explain all turns in this but the result is that he needs to reinstall the Hangul 97 and the disk is gone. The Korean maker of the OS, Haansoft, refuse to cooperate and sell such an old version of their OS. Are there any institution or private person who might have a disc with this OS? If there are, I would be very grateful to know. As this question might not be of interest to all members of this list...any answer might be better to do to my private mail - ___@swipnet.se


Sincerely

Karin Lofgren

Karin Lofgren
SAR/MSA Ph.D Architect
History of Japanese Architecture
KAD Karin Lofgren Arkitektur & Design
and
Jordens Arkitekter AB
www.jordens.se
Helgagatan 36:10
118 58 Stockholm
Sweden
+46 (0)8 462 01 45

----------------------------------------------------
From: Karin L÷fgren <___@swipnet.se>
Date: January 28, 2007 23:19:15 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Ask for help - Hangul 97

Dear Alexander...
... and you all who immediately discovered my miss-printing. Thank you for your fast comments and help offer. Hangul 97 is of course not an operative system. I made a misstake here. It is a word processor. My friend use it for its qualities when based in Korea but working with Japanese/English translations. He has a Window OS which he has reinstalled. The problem he has is to be able to open his files, on his hard disk as well as on his backup discs, he must have the Hangul 97 wordprocessor program installed. At the school where he works they do no longer have these discs with the program. Yes, Hangul 97 is an old version and with the newer Hangul versions one are easily able to convert the Hangul files into several other formats. But the main problem is - if he can not open the orignal files in Hangul 97 he can not convert them it seems. His backup "on floppy" reads as corrupted when trying to open them on newer versions in another computer. So - any help in locating a copy of the Hangul 97 program would be truly and warmly appreciated. I know the depth of his research stored on this disc so I am nearly as desperate as him if this would be lost.

Most sincerely

Karin

Karin L÷fgren
SAR/MSA Ph.D Architect
History of Japanese Architecture
KAD Karin L÷fgren Arkitektur & Design
___@swipnet.se
and
Jordens Arkitekter AB
www.jordens.se
Helgagatan 36:10
118 58 Stockholm
Sweden
+46 (0)8 462 01 45

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Joseph Elacqua" <joseph.___@gmail.com>
Date: January 29, 2007 1:37:19 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Ask for help - Hangul 97

Dear Karin,
     I'm not sure if this helps or not, but according to wikipedia  ---- [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangul_(word_processor) ---- the program OpenOffice can open Hangul 97 files.  I do not use OpenOffice, so I do not know how well it will preserve Korean/Japanese text, however OpenOffice is 100% FREE to download and install, so you would lose nothing by trying that option.  OpenOffice can be downloaded at http://www.openoffice.org
     If that doesn't help, please let me know.  I may be able to help further still, especially if the original company refuses to redistribute the older program.

- Joseph P. Elacqua
Graduate Student (in Fall 2007)
----------------------------------------------------
From: Karin L÷fgren <___@swipnet.se>
Date: January 29, 2007 2:10:58 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Ask for help - Hangul 97

Dear Joseph.

Thank you for your very very quick reply. I will emediately forward your suggestion to my friend. If your suggestion would not work, may I in that case put you in direct contact with my friend instead of me acting as middle person (as I might not be god enough in explaining all computer details in this matter)?

Sincerely and thankfully

Karin


Karin L÷fgren
SAR/MSA Ph.D Architect
History of Japanese Architecture
KAD Karin L÷fgren Arkitektur & Design
___@swipnet.se

and
Jordens Arkitekter AB
www.jordens.se
Helgagatan 36:10
118 58 Stockholm
Sweden
+46 (0)8 462 01 45
----------------------------------------------------

From: "Alexander Vovin" <___@gmail.com>
Date: January 29, 2007 5:49:24 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Ask for help - Hangul 97

Dear Karin,

       As I said earlier, newer versions of Hangul, like Hangul2004
should be able to open any Hangul97 files. You then can convert them
to a number of programs, including higher version of Hangul, like
Hangul2004. Send a sample file, and in a couple of days I can tell you
for sure whether this works or not.

Sasha
============
Alexander Vovin
Professor of East Asian Languages
University of Hawaii at Manoa

----------------------------------------------------
From: Christina Laffin <christina.___@ubc.ca>
Date: January 27, 2007 4:44:13 GMT+09:00
Subject:     [pmjs] UBC noh announcement
   
Noh Performance and Workshop

The University of British Columbia Department of Asian Studies and Theatre at UBC are pleased to announce a traditional Japanese theatre performance by the Uzawa Noh Troupe on February 17, 2006 and a workshop on February 16. The eleven-member troupe will perform Lady Aoi (Aoinoue), as well as excerpts from The Diver (Ama), and Takasago.

Both events will take place at the Frederic Wood Theatre (6354 Crescent Rd. UBC Campus, Gate 4)
Performance: Sat. Feb. 17 at 7:30 pm (tickets: $20/18/12/Group rate)
Free Workshop: Fri. Feb. 16 at 6:00 pm
Advance booking recommended for performance & free workshop (call 604.822.2678 or see www.theatre.ubc.ca for details)

These events are made possible through the generous support of the Toshiba International Foundation, the Japan Foundation, Pacific Western Brewing Company, the Consulate-General of Japan, UBC Women's Studies, and the Centre for Japanese Research at the UBC Institute of Asian Research.

Further information is available at http://www.asia.ubc.ca/index.php?id=4985

Following the UBC visit, the Uzawa Noh Troupe will travel to Oberlin, Pittsburgh, and Wellesley.  For more on events at Oberlin College see http://www.oberlin.edu/eas/events/NohTroupe.htm?id=4985, at the University of Pittsburgh see http://www.ucis.pitt.edu/asc/news/index.shtml, and at Wellesley College see
http://www.wellesley.edu/EALL/events.html.



From: "Joseph Elacqua" <joseph.___@gmail.com>
Date: February 5, 2007 11:45:46 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Upon reading Heike monogatari, I found the mention of one of the Taoist gods of death, "His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun (泰山府君, Jp: タイザンフクン)" as he is called in Herbert A. Giles's translation of the Yu Li Ch'ao Chuan (in Strange Stories from a Chinese Studio).  He was apparently the one of the five Lords of Death who lived under T'ai-shan in China and governed the longevity of a person's life, though I think he was eventually dethroned in Japan by the Buddhist Emma-Oh in terms of divine popularity.  He is also mentioned in Konjaku monogatari (if memory serves, tale 19/24) when Abe no Seimei uses the ritual of Taizanfukun-sai (sometimes Taizanfukun no matsuri) in order to save the life of a dying monk by substituting another.

My question is this:  are there any other pre-modern Japanese works that contain any other references to T'ai-shan fu-chun or the ritual of Taizanfukun-sai?  Since he is mentioned in such renouned sources as Heike and Konjaku, I'm fairly certain that he was a known deity in Heian Japan, though I don't know that any other Japanese work contains such a reference.  Is there anyone who has come across such a reference in their own fieldwork?  Apologies in advance if this is too general or too strange of a question for the list.


- Joseph P. Elacqua
Graduate Student as of Fall 2007

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: February 5, 2007 12:14:23 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Joseph,

You might also want to look at the noh play "Taisanbukun" (same kanji, 泰山府君) based on the Sakuramachi Chunagon Shigenori that appears in Genpei josuiki, book 2, "The Matter of Kiyomori's Daughters"--this gives a more extended account of the Sakuramachi Chunagon story than the one found in the Kakuichi-bon Heike monogatari, 1:5 "Wagami no eiga."

Shigenori laments that cherry blossoms last only 7 days. Taisanbukun responds to his prayers by making the sakura blossom 37 days. This is essentially the plot of the noh play, though the waki is not identified as Sakuramachi Chunagon in some schools of noh.

Thomas Hare translates the title as "Archdemon Taisan." The play is mentioned by Zeami, though opinion seems to be divided over its authorship.  You'll find text and older Japanese translation in Sanari Kentaro, ed., Yokyoku Taikan, vol. 3, pp. 1733ff. There is a text online in the UTAHI site (EUC encoding):
http://www.kanazawa-bidai.ac.jp/%7Ehangyo/utahi/text/yo200.txt

Michael Watson

----------------------------------------------------
From: Kristina Buhrman <___@usc.edu>
Date: February 5, 2007 12:29:19 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Regarding Mr. Elacqua's query, I once did a search through the Historiographical Institute's database looking for the Taizanfukun-sai, and found over 100 examples. It definitely seems to be present in the diary and chronicle literature, at least.

I was prompted by the number of references to the rite in the Azuma kagami, where it was performed apparently in response to drought and earthquake. Since it seems usually to be a rite performed for illness, I've been investigating whether these cases in the Azuma kagami can be understood as repurposings of the Taizanfukun-sai (in response to group disaster), or personal-health rithals for the bakufu elites (prompted by the disaster as portent). It's a very subtle
distinction, but I suspect the latter to be the case.

It also shows up in the Shoyuki as performed by Seimei and a Tendai monk, if I'm remembering correctly. As far as I know, this is the first appearance of the rite in the record. (How much Abe no Seimei did in fact change the performance of court onmyodo in Japan is a question I'd love to get to the bottom to.)

If any member of PMJS happens to know of any studies or sources for the Taizanfukun-sai, or about the diety himself, I would also greatly appreciate any information.

As an aside, the Taizanfukun-sai made an appearance in a recent manga--I believe, as a spell. I'd have to go into my old correspondance for more information, but one of my friends was translating the manga for Viz around the time I was reading those sections of the Azuma kagami, and asked me if there was a standard translation for Taizanfukun. Odd, sometimes, the coincidences you run into when dealing with matters onmyodo-related.

Kristina Buhrman     ___@usc.edu
Graduate student, Japanese history before 1600
Department of History
University of Southern California

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Joseph Elacqua" <joseph.___@gmail.com>
Date: February 5, 2007 12:46:37 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Kristina -- onmyodo has been a popular subject of manga and other fiction in Japan, especially recently.  In the 2001 film, Onmyoji, Abe no Seimei uses Taizanfukun-sai to restore Minamoto no Hiromasa from death.  In a related novel in the series, Seimei uses it the same way that he does in Konjaku, though Yumemakura Baku adds an interesting twist and the appearance of Ashiya Doman as well.  The manga/anime you might be thinking of is "Abenobashi Maho Shotengai," which is fairly centered on onmyodo, though I'm not sure if Viz licensed that one or not.  If it's not that one, I would like to know which one it is since it's likely not one I'm familiar with, even though I've been trying to keep up-to-date on onmyodo in modern fiction.  Now that I think of it, it could also be "Shaman King."

Is the Historiographical Institute's database something that is publically accessible on the internet or something I have to go through leaps and bounds to check?  I'm not familiar with the Historiographical Institute, so any info on that would be good too.

Everyone else, thanks for the replies!  I'll be certain to check them!!


- Joseph P. Elacqua
Graduate Student as of Fall 2007

----------------------------------------------------
From: Richard Emmert <___@gol.com>
Date: February 5, 2007 13:00:24 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Joseph and Michael,

The reading for the name of the noh play is actually Taisanpukun, "pu" instead of "bu." I have seen references to Taisanpukun in other noh plays too. Hanagatami is one which comes to mind.

Rick Emmert

--
Richard Emmert
Artistic Director, Theatre Nohgaku (http://www.theatrenohgaku.org/)
Director, Noh Training Project (http://www.nohtrainingproject.org)
[also (http://www.iijnet.or.jp/NOH-KYOGEN/english/english31.html)]
Professor of Asian Theater and Music, Musashino University, Tokyo
(http://www.musashino-u.ac.jp/specialfeature/profile/pro_literature.html)

Home:
Hon-cho 2-27-10, Nakano-ku
Tokyo  164-0012  Japan
tel: 81-3-3373-0553
fax: 81-3-3373-4509
email: ___@gol.com

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Janet R. Goodwin" <___@pollux.csustan.edu>
Date: February 5, 2007 14:37:08 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: T'ai-shan fu-chun--Shiryo hensanjo database


Joseph,

The Shiryo hensanjo database is accessible on the Internet and is available to anyone.  Just go to:

http://www.hi.u-tokyo.ac.jp/index-j.html

and follow the links from there. You can search through komonjo, courtier diaries (Dai nihon kokiroku), & Dai nihon shiryo among others.  Not only can you do a keyword search, but you can also access images of the (printed) text itself in most cases.

Such images are not available in the case of Heian and Kamakura ibun except within the institute, but you can still find a listing of references and go to the collections themselves in your library.

This is an extremely useful reference tool that also includes maps, pictures, and an online glossary of Japanese terms translated into English.

For an overview of the Institute, see http://www.hi.u-tokyo.ac.jp/

--Janet Goodwin

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: February 5, 2007 19:27:20 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: T'ai-shan fu-chun

Rick Emmert is quite right about the reading Taisanpukun for the noh play title. I should have checked more recent authorities than Sanari--where the rubi is so tiny that my ageing eyes can't distinguish pu from bu even with a magnifying glass!

Other readings are found in other literary works. Heike 9:17 ("Tomoakira no saigo) has Taizanbukun (NKBT 33, p. 224). _Soga monogatari_ has a whole section entitled "Taisanbukun no koto" (NKBT 88, p. 101). The collection _Kokon chomonju_ has a story about Abe no Yasuchika calling up the demon (no rubi,  story 124, NKBT 84, p. 131). In Ueda Akinari, the name is read Taizanfukun (NKBT 56, p. 303).

Michael Watson

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Hiroshi Araki" <___@let.osaka-u.ac.jp>
Date: February 3, 2007 7:21:31 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  International Workshop in Osaka

Dear members,

We will hold an international workshop on Japanese literature on Sunday, March 4, 2007.

Re-thinking International, Interdisciplinary and Transcultural Studies of Japanese Literature:
International Workshop in Osaka

Co-sponsored by the National Institute of Japanese Literature and the School of Letters, Osaka University.

Details about the program are given in my small blog page:
http://hiroark.blog.bai.ne.jp/

Venue: Osaka International Convention Center (OICC GRAND CUBE OSAKA)
http://www.gco.co.jp/english/english.html

I hope many members of pmjs will attend our workshop.

Regards,

Hiroshi Araki (Osaka University)
___@let.osaka-u.ac.jp

----------------------------------------------------
From: Nobumi Iyanaga <n-___@nifty.com>
Date: February 5, 2007 22:30:46 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: His Infernal Majesty T'ai-shan fu-chun

Dear Joseph,

On Taizan-fukun, you will find a very well informed article in the Mochizuki bukkyoo daijiten (p. 3225-3226).  On Chinese origins, there is a classic book by Chavannes, Le T’ai Chan (that you can download From:
<http://classiques.uqac.ca/classiques/chavannes_edouard/C06_le_tai_chan/le_tai_chan.html>)

I think there are works by Michel SoymiÚ which deal with Taizan-fukun, but I don't have the titles at hand.

The little article "Taizan-fukun" in Japanese Wikipedia <http://www.google.co.jp/search?hl=ja&q=%E6%B3%B0%E5%B1%B1%E5%BA%9C%E5%90%9B&btnG=Google+%E6%A4%9C%E7%B4%A2&lr=> can be useful as well.

Best regards,

Nobumi Iyanaga
Tokyo,
Japan

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: February 5, 2007 23:37:36 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Book announcement: Manga from the Floating World

Apologies for cross-posting.

The Harvard University Asia Center announces the publication of a new book: “Manga from the Floating World: Comicbook Culture and the Kibyoshi of Edo Japan” by Adam L. Kern.

Based on extensive research using primary sources in their original editions, “Manga from the Floating World” is the first full-length study in English of the kibyoshi, a vastly popular genre of humorous pictorial fiction for adults. Copiously illustrated with over 200 figures (including many rare prints from Japanese archival collections), this book also presents three complete annotated translations by major author-artist Santo Kyoden (1761-1816) that closely reproduce the experience of reading the original works. By addressing the kibyoshi’s history, readership, narrative conventions, sophisticated visual-verbal play, and relationship to the modern Japanese comicbook, Kern offers a sustained close reading of the vibrant popular imagination of late eighteenth-century Japan.

Adam L. Kern is Associate Professor of Japanese Literature at Harvard University.

For more information please visit: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/KERMAN.html

----------------------------------------------------
From: eiji sekine <___@purdue.edu>
Date: February 5, 2007 11:26:49 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  ajls news/call for papers

Apologoes for cross-listing.
Here is an electronic copy of our latest newsletter, which includes the
call for papers of this year's AJLS conference to be held at Princeton
University.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AJLS Newsletter
Association for Japanese Literary Studies
No. 25 (Spring, 2007) Edited by Eiji Sekine
[AJLS Newsletter Sponsor: FLL, Purdue University]

AJLS . Purdue University . 640 Oval Drive. W. Lafayette, IN 47907-2039 . USA
765.496.2258 (Tel) . 765.496.1700 (Fax) . ___@purdue.edu (Email)
http://www.sla.purdue.edu/fll/AJLS (Web site)

The Sixteenth Annual Meeting
Literature and Literary Theory
November 2-4, 2007
Princeton University

. CALL FOR PAPERS
What is literature? What is literary theory? What are the boundaries of
Japanese literature? Japanese literary theory? Discussions on these
questions are inexhaustible yet unavoidable in our study. These basic
questions govern our practices because they define our discipline as
well as our approaches to our objects of inquiry. In Japan and
elsewhere, historical contingencies have defined and redefined
“literature” and “literary theory”; numerous theoretical trends have
further configured and reconfigured the contours of “literature.” The
categories “Japan” and “Japanese” too have gone through much
transformation, further complicating this line of inquiry. This
three-day conference will revisit these basic questions and attempt to
rigorously explore the foundation of our study.
As Michel Foucault has shown, literature as we know it now is a 19th
Century invention. But works we categorize under the rubric “literature”
have existed since time immemorial and across the globe. Various
approaches have been taken to theorize literary works: in premodern
Japan, we have, for example, a variety of karon (poetic theories) such
as the famous “Preface” to the Kokinshu- by Ki no Tsurayuki and other
genre-specific treatises such as those on renga (linked verse) and
haiku. Discussions of prose narratives have also appeared throughout
history. Western literature, aesthetics, and philosophy entered Japan of
the modern period, and literature took a dramatic turn: the discipline
of “literature” was produced, along with a new sense of aesthetics and
new attitudes toward expression and form. Whether in the premodern or
modern era, theories thus not only offered paradigms by which to compose
and interpret their putative literary objects, but they often arose out
of complex negotiations with the varying forces of history.
The above questions cannot be divorced from the more recent theoretical
trends, evidenced in the surge of theories that we often categorize
under the blanket term “postmodernism” that have further reconfigured
our literary practices: these include post-structuralism,
postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, and other theories of gender
and sexuality to name a few. Many such movements have questioned the
basic tenets of our past and present literary studies and hence the
boundaries of “literature.” How do these theoretical perspectives define
Japanese literature? What are their strengths and weaknesses? What are
the main theoretical issues governing our study for literature today?
This conference hopes to address such issues and more.
The scope of inquiry will range from ancient writings to contemporary
texts. We hope the participants will explore a variety of issues,
including but not limited to:

. Recent theoretical trends: their possibilities and limits
. Historical changes in how we perceive literature and literary theory
in Japan
. The transformation of the role of the author and his/her relation to
the literary production in the history of Japanese literature
. Historical development of literary theory from the premodern to modern
times.
. Shifting boundaries of “Japan” and “Japanese-ness”
. The mutual relationship between theory and practice and how they have
evolved in the history of Japanese literature
. The relationship between a chosen mode of discourse and its “object”
. How theories of translation, cultural studies, and nationalism engage
with the production of Japanese cultural and literary boundaries
. Relationship between history, memory, and literature in Japan
. Relationship between politics and literature in Japan
. "Anti-theory” and “pro-theory” in the study of Japanese literature

Deadline for receipt of abstracts of no more than 250 words is May 15,
2007. We welcome individual submissions as well as 3 or 4 person panel
proposals. To facilitate maximal audience participation, there will be
no formal discussants. Conference languages are English and Japanese.

Proposals should be submitted electronically to the conference website:
http://www.princeton.edu/ajls/

All other correspondence may be directed to the organizers Richard H.
Okada and Atsuko Ueda via the contact informationlisted below:
AJLS 2007
Department of East Asian Studies
211 Jones Hall
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08544
___@princeton.edu

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PAPER/PANEL PROPOSAL FORM
Literature and Literary theory
DEADLINE: May 15, 2007

Title:



Name and Status:



Institution:



Address:



Telephone: Fax:



E-mail:


Please attach your 250-word proposal to this form and send to:
http://www.princeton.edu/ajls/
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
. 2006 MEETING REPORT
The fifteenth annual meeting of the Association for Japanese Literary
Studies was held at the Tokyo campus of Josai International University
on the first and second of July, 2006. On the theme of “Travel in
Japanese Representational Culture,” 59 panelists presented their papers.
The keynote addresses by a noted SF novelist, Komatsu Sakyo^ and
Professor Yoshiaki Shimizu of Princeton University, together with the
major address by Professor Herbert Plutschow of Josai International
University, offered the conference attendees further understanding of
Japanese travel literature and culture. Over 120 people attended the
association’s first international conference held outside the States.
The conference was chaired by Professor Mizuta Noriko, Chancellor of
Josai University Corporation, organized by Professor Miki Sumito, his
administrators (Professors Kawano Yuka, Okada Miyako, and David Luan),
and Josai Corporation staff. Their meticulous organization and warm
hospitality were highly appreciated by all attending members. Professor
Mizuta was interviewed by the Daily Yomiuri and talked about our
conference. The article was published on August 4, 2006.

. AJLS MEMBERSHIP
The annual fee is $25.00 for regular, student, and institution members
($35.00 for overseas members outside North America). Membership provides
you with:
. Panel participation for our annual meeting (if your proposal is selected).
. Two newsletters
. One copy of our latest proceedings.
. One free copy of a back or additional current issue of the proceedings
if you are a student member.
Inquiries and orders (with checks payable to AJLS) should be sent to the
AJLS office. Further information on back issues of our newsletter,
proceedings, and other activities is available on our website:
www.sla.purdue.edu/fll/AJLS.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AJLS Membership Form

Name:

_________________________________
Mailing Address:



_________________________________
City State

_________________________________
Country
____________________________________
Zip
____________________________________
Tel:
____________________________________
Email:

____________________________________
Institution:
____________________________________
Status:
( ) Regular ( ) Student

If you are a student, indicate which year free copy you would like: ( )
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. AJLS CONFERENCE HOST FOR 2008
University of British Columbia will host our next year’s conference in
the Fall of 2008. If you are interested in hosting an AJLS meeting for
2009 or later, please contact Professor Ann Sherif at:
ann.___@oberlin.edu or 440.775.8827.

. NEW PROCEEDINGS and BACK ISSUES
The new issues of our proceedings, Reading Material: The Production of
Narratives, Genres and Literary Identities (PAJLS, vol. 7) and Travel in
Japanese Representational Culture: Its Past, Present, and Future (PAJLS,
vol. 8), will be published this summer. The following back issues are
available. Each copy is $10.00 for AJLS members and $15.00 for
non-members. Orders should be sent to the AJLS office. (Add $10 for
mailing if you order from outside the North American area.)

Poetics of Japanese Literature: vi, 207pp, 1993.

Revisionism in Japanese Literary Studies, PMAJLS, vol. 2: vi, 336pp., 1996.

Issues of Canonicity and Canon Formation in Japanese Literary Studies,
PAJLS, vol. 1: vi, 532 pp., 2000.

Acts of Writing, PAJLS, vol. 2: ix, 428 pp., 2001.

Japan from Somewhere Else, PAJLS, vol. 3: vi, 158 pp., 2002.

Japanese Poeticity and Narrativity Revisited, PAJLS, vol. 4: vi, 344
pp., 2003.

Hermaneutical Strategies: Methods of Interpretation in the Study of
Japanese Literature, PAJLS, vol. 4: xiii, 517 pp., 2004

Landscapes Imagined and Remembered, PMAJLS, vol. 6 : vii, 215 pp., 2005

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: February 8, 2007 5:17:57 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Call for Papers: Critical Feminist Biography as Translocal History

Call for Papers: Critical Feminist Biography as Translocal History

/ /

/Journal of Women’s History/ Special Issue

Co-edited by Marilyn Booth and Antoinette Burton

Comparative Literature, History, and Gender and Women’s Studies

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

USA

The return of the embodied subject as a site generative of analytical
force and explanatory power in fields of inquiry throughout the
humanities and social sciences, including postcolonial theory and even
global studies, calls for reassessing the work of feminist biography as
a form of historical knowledge. We seek papers that engage the dynamics
of feminist biography as a critical mode of historical thinking and
especially as an articulation of translocal history. We use the term
translocal in dynamic tension with the transnational, in part to
re-appropriate the geographical specificities entailed by critical
biography as a feminist practice, and in part to insist on the capacity
of feminist biography to illuminate geopolitics beyond the boundaries of
the nation. We are interested in essays that focus on the construction
of biographical subjects while theorizing problems that arise from the
conjuncture of individual figures moving across space and time; the
presumptions of history as a discipline; and/or the limits and blind
spots of feminist inquiry as it has been practiced in the academy. We
are especially keen to receive submissions from scholars residing
outside Euro-America and/or interrogating the limits of the western
historical canon.

The deadline for submissions is 1 August 2007. Please be sure to consult
the /JWH/ website for submission guidelines:
http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_womens_history/guidelines.html.
Submissions should be addressed to:

Marilyn Booth and Antoinette Burton

Co-editors, Critical Feminist Biography Special Issue

/Journal of Women’s History/

c/o Department of History

University of Illinois

810 South Wright Street

Urbana, IL 61801

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Sekimori" <___@ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp>
Date: February 8, 2007 15:18:25 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Call for Papers AAR 2007

Subject: Call for Papers: AAR 2007 Japanese Religions

Dear Colleagues

We are seeking participants who would like to join a proposed panel at the AAR, San Diego, November 17-20, 2007 on the differentiation of Kami and Buddhist deities and practices in late 19th century Japan.

Proposed Panel Title: New Ways of Thinking about Shinbutsu-Bunri (Differentiation of Kami and Buddhist Deities and Practices in Japan)

The goal of this panel is to explore how shinbutsu-bunri was experienced in the early Meiji period and beyond, and how it has been understood by modern scholarship, both within Japan and abroad. Over and above this, the panel’s central concern is to formulate new ways of envisioning the shinbutsu-bunri phenomenon, with the intent of encouraging paradigms that may serve us better than those we have at present.

We seek papers that discuss the implications and aftermath of shinbutsu-bunri, both in the later nineteenth century and in contemporary Japan. We also welcome papers that broaden the theoretical discussion, primarily from the disciplines of history, religious studies and anthropology.

Interested parties should contact us off-list at one of the email addresses below. Panel proposals must be submitted to the AAR by March 1, 2007, so if you're interested in participating please send me your paper proposal including your name and institutional affiliation by Feb. 20, 2007.

Gaynor Sekimori, University of Tokyo
Email: ___@ioc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Dominick Scarangello, University of Virginia
Email: ___@virginia.edu

 ----------------------------------------------------
From: Bruce Willoughby <___@umich.edu>
Date: February 9, 2007 5:44:08 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  New Publication


A Cultural History of Japanese Women’s Language

by Endo Orie

Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies, No. 57

ISBN 9781929280391, 2006, vii + 139 pp., $38.00. Cloth only.

Among Japanese nostalgic for older times, as well as students and
scholars of Japanese, it is commonly assumed that the Japanese language
possesses special words reserved for women. Did these “women’s words”
actually exist at the very beginnings of the Japanese language? If such
words were in fact part of the language, what kinds of attitudes and
treatment toward women were inscribed in them? In her endeavor to
address these questions, Endo Orie explores Japan’s early literary
works to discover what they have to say about the Japanese language.
Among her most significant conclusions is the finding that “womanly”
language in Japan was socially mandated and regulated only with the
beginning of warrior rule in the Kamakura period. Now, in contemporary
Japan, critics charge that women’s language has lost its “womanly”
qualities and has veered perilously close to men’s language. However,
if we look at the evidence of history, what we may actually be
witnessing is a return to the origins of the Japanese language when no
sexual distinctions were made between users.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: February 10, 2007 0:33:14 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  A Reminder:  Early Modern Japan Network at the AAS:  The Kibyo-shi: "Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography" in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks

A reminder that the Early Modern Japan Network will hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the Association for Asian Studies Annual Meeting in Boston on Thursday afternoon, March 22 from 2 p.m.  Please mark your calendars as this announcement will not appear in the AAS program.  We will meet in Salon D.  We have an exciting, innovative panel planned.   The full description of the panel follows.

See you in Boston!

Philip Brown
Early Modern Japan Network




“The Kibyōshi:

Parody, Porn, Alterity, and Autobiography

in Mid Edo-Period Comicbooks”


Historically derided as a kind of frivolous comicbook for “women and children” of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the kibyōshi was actually an urbane genre of pictorial comic fiction for adults, characterized by its mature wit, sophisticated visual-verbal play, radical allusivity to the entire thousand-year Japanese cultural imagination (if not also to the even longer Chinese one), and, perhaps most surprisingly, edgy sociopolitical satire. In spite of much rhetoric to the contrary, the readers of the kibyōshi were primarily educated townsmen. And although some notable merchants wrote in the genre, most authors were low-ranking samurai, a fact that suggests that the many politically irreverent works served as vehicles for nominal members of the ruling elite to criticize with relative impunity (albeit under pseudonyms) their superiors—if not the very ideology of Tokugawa Japan itself.

Arguably the most widely read genre in its own day, the vast popularity of the kibyōshi is rivaled, perhaps, only by its subsequent scholarly neglect. Although interest in the genre has been growing over the past several decades even in the West, especially because of the recent “Edo boom,” this panel draws together several scholars outside Japan whose works take a fresh look, albeit from different vantage points, at this genre that epitomizes one of the greatest peaks in Japanese cultural history.

As is evident from the abstracts below, each panelist explores a different dimension of the kibyōshi: its parodies de-centering symbolic (though viewed increasingly as reified) hierarchies, thereby serving as a crucial juncture between dominant and subordinate cultures (Hirano); its alleged relation to modern Japanese manga in terms of visual-verbal conventions, readership, and erotic representation (Kern); its power as a vehicle for presenting images of the foreign—especially the Western—Other and the resultant impact on the Japanese visual regime (Screech); and its potential, in the hands of one of the period’s greatest littÚrateurs, as meaningful autobiography that can also be read against the grain of that author’s more “serious” works (Walley).

In keeping with the visual-verbal mode of the kibyōshi, each scholarly presentation takes the form not of a traditional talk, but of a documentary video.


ABSTRACTS


1. Katsuya HIRANO (Assistant Professor, Cornell University)—“Power, Parody, Kibyōshi”

              This presentation examines the political implications of parody enacted through the production and circulation of kibyōshi during the late eighteenth century in Tokugawa Japan.  This particular moment marked an extensive, circular, and reciprocal influence between the cultures of subordinate and dominant classes. Popular culture prospered through its clever and creative appropriation of discourses and images produced in high culture (parody), and high culture found it necessary—both willingly and unwillingly so—to incorporate some literary, aesthetic, and intellectual elements from popular culture into its own form. This increasing reciprocity of influence between dominant and subordinate cultures inadvertently de-centered symbolic hierarchies—the cultural configurations of power—constructed by the Tokugawa regime. I argue that it was the kibyōshi and its authors that played a central role in this extensive interaction of these two cultural spheres, and that this interaction had a destabilizing effect on cultural distinctions designed to maintain the social hierarchies of Tokugawa Japan.


2. Adam KERN (Associate Professor, Harvard University)—“‘Manga Culture’ and the Kibyōshi”

              A growing number of cultural critics in and out of Japan have begun to hail the kibyōshi as the progenitor of the modern Japanese comicbook (manga). Although the century separating the heyday of the former and the advent of the latter calls such characterizations into question, this presentation explores the relationship between the two genres by examining a number of apparent similarities often cited by the proponents of what can be termed “manga culture theory,” such as the putative use in both genres of panelization, speech balloons, speed lines, and pornography. I argue that most of these similarities turn out to be superficial—hardly evidence of some direct historical link between the kibyōshi and the modern manga. Paradoxically, however, after debunking the notion that artist Katsushika Hokusai coined the term manga, I raise the possibility that in some regards the kibyōshi may actually have been the “original” manga.


3. Timon SCREECH (Professor, SOAS, University of London)—“The Lens in the Art of the Kibyōshi”
              Kibyōshi have recently been the subject of much study, and it has become increasingly apparent how wide was the range of material celebrated in them. Kibyōshi can now be see as an integral part of Floating World culture. One repeated theme is the encounter of Japan—or of Japanese people—with the foreign. Despite the relative seclusion of the Japanese state, kibyōshi reveal that an intense debate about overseas matters was underway. Of course, given the genre, this debate often takes the form of ridicule or satire. Often too, the foreign is given less as an authentic other voice, and is more an eccho of the self.

              This presentation will consider several kibyoshi in which specifically European matters are invoked (as opposed to other kibyōshi addressing Ezo, China or the Ryūkyūs). As will be shown, mention of European inventions, such as hot-air balloons or static-electricity generators, and European sciences, such as surgery and botany, can be found scattered across many works. I shall concentrate in my presentation on one matter: discussion of lensed devices.

              Lenses could be ground in Japan from the late 18th century, but most were imported. In either case, they carried with them a foreign colouration. But the lens was also supposed to be something for lucid and objective vision. Telescopes and microscopes, as well as lensed peepboxes with hidden pictures, offered a metaphor for close, precision inspection of ones surroundings, and in the Floating World those surroundings were social.


4. Glynne WALLEY (Ph.D. candidate, Harvard University)—“ ‘So this guy from Edo walks into a teahouse in Kyoto…,’ Or, Kibyōshi as Autobiography: Bakin’s 1802 Journey to the Capital and A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West”

         In 1802 journeyman author and kibyōshi specialist Takizawa (Kyokutei) Bakin traveled the Tōkaidō to Kyoto and Osaka on one of his rare trips outside of Edo.  His experiences on the road furnished the material for two autobiographical writings: Kiryo manroku, a diary-style travelogue that circulated as a manuscript, and Saritsu udan, a cross between a travelogue and an antiquarian miscellany published in 1804.  In addition, Bakin included references to his trip in some of his kibyōshi he published in 1803.  Of these, A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West (Heso ga wakasu sayu monogatari) is the most extensively concerned with his journey, presenting itself as a collection of funny stories about things he heard or saw on his travels, done up in the style of A Companion to Remember Saikaku By (Saikaku nagori no tomo, 1699) while spoofing the title of the great Chinese classic Journey to the West (Ch. Xi You Ji, J. Sayūki, ca. 1590s).

              This presentation will focus on A Rib-Tickling Journey to the West as an attempt on Bakin’s part to fashion an explicitly autobiographical kibyōshi. I will compare his treatment of his travels here to those found in his prose travelogues, addressing the effects on these disparate works of audience expectations and generic conventions.  I will also examine Bakin’s evolving authorial persona as evident in this kibyōshi, and what the trip to the West meant for him and his writing.  Finally, I will situate this work in the context of Bakin’s other late kibyōshi, as part of his interest in kibyōshi organized around principles other than narrative.

 ----------------------------------------------------

From: Max Moerman <___@barnard.edu>
Date: February 10, 2007 3:42:49 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  [Keene Center] Next Thursday's lecture/concert: The Ancient Asian Harp Reborn



Please join the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture and the Institute for Medieval Japanese Studies for the second event in the Ancient Soundscapes: New Echoes from Japan’s Musical Past series.

The Ancient Asian Harp Reborn
Bo Lawergren (Professor Emeritus, Hunter College and music archeologist)
Tomoko Sugawara (Harpist and specialist on the angular harp)

Lawergen will trace this history of the angular harp, as well as its archeological discovery and recent resurrection. Sugawara will play tunes from both the ancient and the emerging contemporary repertoire with a replica of the ancient harp. This concert will be the New York City premiere of several pieces composed for specifically for Ms. Sugawara.

The angular harp, with an L-shaped body, arose in Mesopotamia around 2000 BCE and, following the Silk Road, reached China and eventually Korea and Japan. Artists in all the cultures it penetrated loved to depict its beautiful shape and their local musicians playing it. Around the year 1000 CE, however, the European harp of irregular triangular shape emerged, and by 1600 the angular harp vanished. Recently, music archeologists have reconstructed the angular harp (called the kugo in Japan and konghou in China). Bo Lawergren (Professor Emeritus, Hunter College and music archeologist) will trace this history of the angular harp, as well as its archeological discovery and recent resurrection. Tomoko Sugawara (a Japanese specialist on the angular harp) will perform resurrected ancient tunes from T’ang China and Nara Japan as well as modern pieces composed for the kugo.

The music performed will included pieces composed by Toshi Ichiyanagi, one of Japan's premier composers; Robert Lombardo, Professor Emeritus in composition at Roosevelt University in Chicago; and Stephen Dydo, who received his DMA in composition at Columbia University in 1975.


Date:   Thursday, February 15th, 2007
Time:   6:00 – 8:00PM
Place: 301 Philosophy Hall, Columbia University
          116th & Amsterdam (between St. Paul’s Chapel and Kent Hall)
Map:    http://www.columbia.edu/about_columbia/map/kent.html

This event is free and open to the public. No reservations are necessary.
Please visit www.donaldkeenecenter.org for more information about this event and upcoming events.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Andreas Niehaus <___@yahoo.com>
Date: February 12, 2007 16:22:45 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  job opening

Please take note of the following position as lecturer or senior lecturer in the field of Japanese Language and Culture at the University of Ghent. Application deadline is March 15, 2007. The original advertisement  can be accessed here: https://webster.ugent.be/vacatures/ZAP/LW15eng.html
Please note also: Non-Dutch speaking individuals will be expected to learn Dutch within three years.
Best regards
Andreas Niehaus

Faculty of Arts and Philosophy – a full-time vacancy as Professor in the rank of Lecturer (docent) or Professor in the rank of Senior Lecturer (hoofddocent) in the field of Japanese Language and Culture.
The faculty of Arts and Philosophy has a vacancy for a professorship, starting from October 1, 2007. It concerns a job as full-time Professor in the rank of Lecturer (docent) or Professor in the rank of Senior Lecturer (hoofddocent) in the Department of Languages and Cultures of South and East Asia, charged with academic teaching (in Dutch), scientific research and carrying out scientific duties in the field of Japanese Language and Culture.
Profile:
• on the day of application, candidates should hold a PhD degree with doctoral thesis in Oriental languages and cultures or a degree recognized as equivalent with a doctoral thesis in the domain of Japanese language and culture;
• candidates are expected to have profound knowledge of classical and modern Japanese as well as classical Chinese;
• good knowledge of both written and spoken English is required;
• candidates are required to have research experience in the field of Japanese history, proved by recent publications in national and international peer reviewed journals and/or books;
• experience in international mobility, amongst others through participation in research programs at research institutions not linked to the university where the highest degree was obtained, would be an advantage;
• candidates are required to possess the necessary didactic, organizational and communicative skills for teaching at an academic level.
More detailed information on this vacancy and on the way this job fits in the department’s strategy can be obtained at prof. Eddy Moerloose, head of the department (phone: +32 9/264.40.95; e-mail: eddy.___@ugent.be).
In principle this full-time position will lead to a tenured position, without prejudice to the possibility of, in case of a first appointment as a professor, the Board of Governors of Ghent University to change the tenured position into an appointment for a duration of maximum three years possibly leading to tenure after a positive evaluation.
Depending on the specific profile of the selected candidate, the rank of Senior Lecturer or Lecturer will be granted.
Applications must be sent in duplicate by registered mail to the rector of Ghent University, Rectorate building, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 25, 9000 Ghent, using the specific application forms Autonomous Academic Staff ("ZAP"), including the necessary attestations of competence (copies of degrees), the 15th of March 2007 at the latest.
The application forms for Autonomous Academic Staff (ZAP)
• can be obtained at Ghent University, Department of Personnel and Organization, Sint-Pieternieuwstraat 25, 9000 Gent.
• can be requested by phone: +32 (0) 9 264 31 29 or 264 31 30.
• can be downloaded from the internet:
http://www.ugent.be/nl/voorzieningen/personeelszaken/aanwerving/medewerkers/formulieren/zap

----------------------------------------------------
From: Morgan Pitelka <___@oxy.edu>
Date: February 14, 2007 11:18:53 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  JAHF/PMJS: Koguryo and its neighbors


A Conference on Ancient Korean History

Kogury˘ and Its Neighbors:  International Relations in Early Northeast Asia

Saturday, Feb. 24 ,  9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Korean Cultural Center, Los Angeles
5505 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036

Sponsored by Northeast Asian History Foundation & Korean Cultural Center, Los Angeles
Free and Open to the Public

Tentative Schedule
09:00—09:10    Welcome:  John Duncan, Director, UCLA Center for Korean Studies
                        Congratulatory remarks:  Kim Yongdeok, President, Northeast Asia History Foundation:
09:10—09:40    The Interstate Order of Ancient Northeast Asia
                        Lim Ki Hwan (Seoul National University of Education)
                        Discussant:  John Duncan (UCLA)
09:40—10:10    Kogury˘ and Kaya:  Contacts and Consequences
                        Kim Tae Sik (Hongik University)
                        Discussant:  Dennis Lee (UCLA)
10:10—10:30    break
10:30—11:10    Control or Conquer?: Kogury˘’s Relations with States and Peoples in Manchuria
                        Mark Byington (Harvard University)
                        Discussant:  Yi S˘ng-jae (Northeast Asian History Foundation)
11:10—11:40    Kogury˘ to Central Asia: Art and Architecture
                        Nancy Steinhardt (Pennsylvania University)
                        Discussant: Burglind Jungmann (UCLA)
11:40—12:00    Questions from the audience
12:00—13:30    Lunch
13:30—14:00    Kogury˘ and Japan
                        Lee Sungsi (Waseda University)
                        Discussant: Herman Ooms (UCLA)
14:00—14:30    Kogury˘ and China: Rivalry on an Equal Footing, Tributary Submission, or Beyond?
                        Stella Xu (Roanoke College)
                        Discussant:  David Schaberg (UCLA)
14:30—14:50    break
14:50—15:20    Kogury˘ and Silla:  Aspects of the Evolution of their Relations
                        Jung Woon Yong (Korea University)
                        Discussant:  Hyung-Wook Kim (UCLA)
15:20—15:50    An Overview of Kogury˘-Paekche Relations: With a Quick Peek into the Quicksands of Space and Early Korean Standard Time
                        Jonathan Best (Wellesley College)
                        Discussant:  Yi In-ch’˘l (Northeast Asian History Foundation)
15:50—16:30    Questions from audience


From: Morgan Pitelka <___@oxy.edu>
Date: February 27, 2007 6:54:51 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  origins of term banzai/wansui

Colleagues,

One of my students is interested in the history of the term banzai/wansui, which of course means "ten thousand years" and was used to hail and celebrate the emperor in premodern China and Japan, later as a war cry, and as a celebratory expression in more recent years. If anyone can suggest readings related to the origins and usage of this term in China or Japan, I would be grateful.

Thanks,

Morgan

*****************
Morgan Pitelka
Swan Hall S115
Occidental College
1600 Campus Road
Los Angeles, CA 90041
OFFICE: 323-259-1421
FAX: 323-341-4940
mailto:___@oxy.edu
*****************

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: February 27, 2007 9:47:48 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

Morgan,

You'll find chapter and verse in Morohashi (Daikanwa jiten vol. 9, p 744). The expression originated as an expression used when drinking--like kanpai/cheers--and only later became used on other occasions. It could be used in wishing anyone long life, etc., but from the Tang period it became used mainly for  the sovereign. The entry cites many early examples from the histories.

Michael Watson

----------------------------------------------------
From: Anthony Bryant <___@cox.net>
Date: February 27, 2007 10:33:04 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

I would have to say, "Why do we say 'Long live the king!' -- I mean, what's the difference?


Tony
----------------------------------------------------
From: Charles DeWolf <___@yahoo.com>
Date: February 27, 2007 12:21:00 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui


One shouldn't forget Sino-Korean mansey, cf. the 1919 Mansei Movement. It's been claimed that the *use* of the term was influenced by Japanese banzai after it had been used in the course of certain unpleasant activities. And those UN troops who heard it shouted by their Communist enemies in 1950 would understandably not have associated it with Wilsonianism. Such are the ironies of history. But it's also included in the South Korean national anthem I heard every day when I lived in the ROK – including the lovely words "Hananim-i powu-hasa wuli-nala mansey" (Yale Romanization) 'Long live our land, with the help of God!' It's claimed that the lyrics go back to 1896. Any hard evidence?

Charles De Wolf

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Alexander Vovin" <___@gmail.com>
Date: February 27, 2007 16:43:34 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

Dear Morgan,

       This is actually a very good question. Mostly off the top of
my head, without doing really any serious etymological search. The
phonetic shape of J banzai betrays a late origin: initial b- clearly
indicates that it is a kan-on, that places it effectively no earlier
than 8th c. A.D. To the best of my knowledge, I have not seen the word
in any Nara period texts. Final -n in ban probably rises a bar for
another three hundred years at least, and a very brief check through
several dictionaries (certainly, dictionaries are only the first line
of inquiry, and they are not the source for *any* etymological work)
did not reveal the word at all for pre-modern Japanese . I am more or
less sure that it will not pop up in any Heian texts, but may be
someone who works with texts from Kamakura -- Edo periods would
remember seeing the word in the texts.
       For Chin. wan4sui4, I do not think I ever saw this in any of
the pre-Han texts. But wan4nian2 (萬年) used exactly in the same way
(天子萬年) as wan4sui4 is attested. Beyond Zhanguo period I would not
really know without doing some thorough checks, but I would suspect
that the expression wan4sui4 should be in the Qing period texts, since
Manchu tumen se '10,000 years' frequently appears in the Manchu texts,
and I'd expect it to be a calque from Chinese.

Best wishes,

Sasha

============
Alexander Vovin
Professor of East Asian Languages
University of Hawaii at Manoa

----------------------------------------------------
From: Richard Emmert <___@gol.com>
Date: February 27, 2007 17:20:28 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

Dear List,

As yet no one has pointed out which to me seems to be an obviously older form than banzai---that is manzai, which is written with the same characters. Manzairaku is a well-known gagaku piece---it is also mentioned in several noh plays and particularly quite prominently in the ritual Okina. A quick look in the Nihon Ongaku Daijiten says that that there are several theories as to when Manzairaku was written in China including sources which suggest the Han dynasty, the Sui dynasty and the T'ang dynasty. I think we can also assume that it was brought to Japan in the Heian period.

Rick Emmert
----------------------------------------------------
From: Stephen Miller <___@asianlan.umass.edu>
Date: February 27, 2007 23:14:44 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Bungo Special Interest Group

The Bungo Special Interest Group of the Association of Teachers of Japanese
will meet in conjunction with the annual conference of Asian Studies in Boston
in Salon C of the Boston Marriott Copley Place on Friday night, March 23, from
7 to 9 PM.  Our speakers this year will be:

1. Charles Quinn (Ohio State University)
2. Yasuko Ito Watt (Indiana University)
3. Patricia Wetzel (Portland State University)

As a continuation of our discussion of pedagogical approaches to teaching
classical Japanese language at last year's meeting in San Francisco, our
three speakers will talk about approaches to including classical Japanese in our
(mostly) modern Japanese language curriculums.

I look forward to seeing you all there.

Stephen Miller

Assistant Professor
Japanese Language and Literature
440 Herter Hall
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003
Phone: 413-545-4953
Fax: 413-545-4975

---------------------------------------------------
From: Aldo Tolli <___@unive.it>
Date: February 28, 2007 0:09:26 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Bungo Special Interest Group

Dear prof. Miller,

I will not be able to take part being in Europe in that period, however I
should be very gratefull is you could keep me informed about the issues of
the meeting, in particular if you publish any report on the matter.
I also teach bungo and I would like very much to keep informed about what
is going on in the USA on teaching bungo.

Best wishes

Aldo Tollini

University of Venice ITALY

---------------------------------------------------
From: Stephen Miller <___@asianlan.umass.edu>
Date: February 28, 2007 0:20:58 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Bungo Special Interest Group

Dear Professor Tollini,

I will indeed keep you informed of our activities.  I will also be sending out a
"survey" for PMJS'ers who are interested in bungo.  I hope you'll fill it out
and send it back to me.

May I ask what kinds of materials you are using now?  Do you use a textbook or
something else?  Are there many universities that teach bungo in Italy or
Europe?

Thank you for your interest.

Best,
Stephen

Assistant Professor
Japanese Language and Literature
440 Herter Hall
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003
Phone: 413-545-4953
Fax: 413-545-4975

---------------------------------------------------
From: "Joseph Elacqua" <joseph.___@gmail.com>
Date: February 28, 2007 0:56:17 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions...

     I apologize in advance for the random weirdness of the following three Mikkyo/Buddhist-related questions.

     I recently came into temporary possession of both the English and Japanese versions of the "Handbook on the Four Stages of Prayoga Chuin Branch of Shingon Tradition."  Like the English translation, the Japanese version is on a set of "spineless" Buddhist texts, comprised of folded sheets.  However, unlike the English ones, the Japanese ones are double-sided.  Unable to read the Japanese ones, I'm wondering which side is the "front" and which is the "back" or if they are read in some wholly different manner entirely.  I figure that since it's a Japanese book, if I have the front cover on top, facing me, and I open the cover to the right, like a Japanese book would open, then the side of the paper facing me is the "front" and that it's read from right to left, and once I get to the end, I flip it over and read the "back" side working my way back to the front cover.  If this is not correct, please let me know.

     Second, I was interested in checking out a copy of the Mikkyo Daijiten and heard that the latest reprint was in 1983.  However, I found a text which cites a 1983 "compressed" version that is only one volume (as opposed to the six-volume 3,000-4,000 page 1960's printing).  I was wondering if there were two 1983 printings, one full and the other abridged, or if the 1983 copy is just extremely thick, holding all six volumes in one text.  Basically I'm trying to find out which is the latest unabridged version -- 1960's or 1983?

     One final (hopefully easy) question I have is this:  what is the difference between a mantra and a dharani?  I've heard both words used to describe what I perceive to be the same thing.  Both seem to be Sanskrit/bonji sentences that tend to start with "on" (Skt. om/aum) and end with "sowaka" (Skt. svaha) and are chanted in repetition.  I can't tell the difference between one and the other.  If the difference changed over time, I'm looking for the Heian/Kamakura distinction between the two.

     Thank you very much for all of your help.  I really appreciate it, and I apologize again for all the weird questions.


- Joseph P. Elacqua
Graduate Student (as of Fall 2007)

---------------------------------------------------
From: Herman Ooms <___@history.ucla.edu>
Date: February 28, 2007 1:03:05 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

Dear List,

The oldest use of Banzai in Japan may very well be the multiple Banzais at the end of the formula pronounced by theYamato no fumibito during the Great Purification Ceremonies held at least twice yearly as mentioned in the Taiho Code of 702. See  Felicia Bock, Engishiki Procedures of the Engi Era, vol 2, p. 89; or Torao Toshiya, Engishiki (Shueisha, 2000), vol. 1: 481. The exorcism formula is unalloyed Daoist; it declares its beneficial reach to extend "to the East as far as Fusoo" (Fusang, or Japan).

Herman Ooms

---------------------------------------------------
From: "Ross Bender" <___@rossbender.org>
Date: February 28, 2007 2:14:35 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

The phrase is found in the "Records (or Stratagems) of the Warring States", "Stratagems of Ch'i, 4." The characters used are the same as in modern Japanese "banzai" -- "ten thousand years." There is an online translation by B.S. Bonsall in which he translates the phrase as "Long Live the Prince." See:

http://lib.hku.hk/bonsall/zhanguoce/index1.html

VOL 11 CH'I IV

   1. Among the men of Ch'i there was a certain Feng Hsuan

Ross Bender

---------------------------------------------------
From: William Bodiford <___@ucla.edu>
Date: February 28, 2007 2:19:15 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui


**** At 07/02/26, Alexander Vovin wrote:

. . . .  I am more or less sure that it will not pop up in any Heian texts, but may be someone who works with texts from Kamakura -- Edo periods would remember seeing the word in the texts.

. . . . but I would suspect that the expression wan4sui4 should be in the Qing period texts, since Manchu tumen se '10,000 years' frequently appears in the Manchu texts, and I'd expect it to be a calque from Chinese.


    I am not sure exactly what you mean to suggest by this chronology.  The term banzai (a.k.a., bansei, mase, manzee, manzai, wansui) is ubiquitous in Buddhist texts, appearing so many times in the Chinese Buddhist canon that the CBETA electronic version stops searching after 2,500 occurrences.  Less trustworthy electronic searches through the random collection of Japanese texts I have on my hard drive produces hits in Japanese Buddhist texts from all periods (of course) as well as From:  Shoku Nihongi, Manyoshu, Engishiki, Utsubo monogatari, Konjaku monogatari, Hogen monogatari, Heike monogatari, many Noh and Kyogen, many so-called "Shinto" texts (such as the Tenchi reiki), and so forth.  In short, it can be found almost wherever one looks.  The way that the term is used and its ritual functions, of course, must have changed greatly over time.  But that is a completely different issue.

    Best wishes,

...... William Bodiford

_______________
William Bodiford  (___@ucla.edu)
Phone:  310--206-8235; FAX  310--825-8808
Dept. of Asian Languages and Cultures
290 Royce Hall; Box 951540
UCLA
Los Angeles CA 90095-1540
_______________
These statements are my own, not those of the University of California.

---------------------------------------------------
From: "Jion Prosser" <___@tendai-lotus.org>
Date: February 28, 2007 2:29:30 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions...

Greetings Joseph & All,

The “accordian-style booklets” that you mention (does anyone have a more accurate, Japanese term for these?) are common within the priesthood and are read as you described: cover inwards, right to left, then flipped.  Some, or all, will be annotated with page numbers at the bottom, left corner.

The Mikkyo Daijiten was published as a condensed version, I have a copy myself, but many if not all of the drawings have been deleted.  As for dates, I leave that to others.  I have one republished from the 80’s.

Your probe into dharani and mantras has been debated many times.  Many scholars actually confuse the two and use the terms concurrently.  On average, dharani relate to zomitsu or mixed esoteric teachings and mantra, or shingon relate to junmitsu or “pure” esoteric works.  Of course in common Japanese practice, that all gets rather jumbled as in those rare cases, certain dharani’s stem from stark, well-recognized “pure” esoteric works.  You mentioned the use of “on” and “sowaka” in Japanese mantras.  These are commonly used in the transliteration of Sanskrit charms resulting in Japanese-sounding mantra words.

I’m unaware of any “time-relevant” changes as most of the esoteric, or mikkyo works that we have to this day are actually commentaries upon the original Heian-era works.  Good luck in your research!

May the merit be yours,
-Rev. Jion Prosser
Tendai Lotus Teachings

-------------------------------------------------
From: ___@unive.it
Date: February 28, 2007 6:06:03 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Bungo Special Interest Group

Dear Stephen,

thank you very much for your kind answer. I am lookoing forward to
receiving a "survey" for PMJS'ers.

As to textbooks I mostly use self-produced materials because my students
prefer to study on texts in Italian language. But among other materails I
advice the students to use the text recently published at Columbia
University by prof. Shirane. However, I really feel the necessity for more
teaching/learning material (not only in printed form). I teach second year
course student History of Japanese language, then at third year classical
Japanese grammar, and at specialist level I analyze and traslate texts
(mostly of Kamakura period).

Presently in Italy bungo is taught in Venice (by me and a colleague), in
Rome, and Catania.

Best wishes

Aldo Tollini

-------------------------------------------------
From: Brian Goldsmith <___@yahoo.com>
Date: February 28, 2007 6:42:15 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Query: Pre-modern postal system

I have generally found that letters tend to move along institutional lines--although this may just reflect how letters survived and made their way into the archive.
Most are from manor to holder and such.  Some of the great warrior houses in the medieval period also maintained "embassies" in Kyoto or Kamakura.  These were used to keep in contact with officials, and were certainly used to send gifts and letters between great persons.  I think I can remember one case where a manor simply dispatched some on a horse.  A bit more than 39 cents, but effective.

Of course there were also wandering monks on pilgrimage, esp after the Onin War.
Later in the Warring States period post systems--ala the Ritsuryo kind of system--seem to have been re-established.

I can think of examples of all this from Echigo, my area.  I don't know of any secondary literature off hand.

My best.

Brian Goldsmith
PhD.D. candidate
Stanford University
Barbara Nostrand <___@acm.org> wrote:
Dear List Members.

It just occurred to me that I don't know how mail was delivered in
pre-modern Japan. Evidently, mail was successfully sent over fairly
great distances during say the Kamakura period, but I don't know how
it got from one place to another. Mail being sent around Heiankyo is
easily explained by household messengers, but long distance mail
requires a bit more. So, I was wondering if someone here can point me
at some articles or other documentation about the pre-modern Japanese
postal system. Thank you very much.

Barbara Nostrand
-------------------------------------------------
From: "Janet R. Goodwin" <___@pollux.csustan.edu>
Date: February 28, 2007 7:33:23 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Correction: AAS Panel #15, Sex, Politics & Buddhist Ideology


Please note the following corrections for AAS Panel #15, scheduled for Thursday evening:

"Justifying Female Rule" will be given by Prof. Noriko Katsuura.  Her name
is incorrectly listed on the program as Noriko Kanda.

Prof. Akiko Yoshie will unfortunately be unable to attend the conference,

--Janet Goodwin (panel discussant)


-------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Pye <___@staff.uni-marburg.de>
Date: February 28, 2007 8:55:31 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions...

Greetings, Joseph and others,

Re mantra and dharani, you will find that the word mantra has come
into common use in English, while dharani (Skt., sorry no
diacriticals) has come into Japanese as darani (and unlike mantra
occurs thus in Japanese dictionaries). This leads to some confusion
when people write about Japanese Buddhism in English, because they may
go for "mantra" even in cases wehere dharani might be more appropriate
if reverting to a Sanskrit term. In Sanskrit they are two different
words.

Most Mahayana sutras, just a little later than the earliest phase,
contain some dharani, sometimes a whole chapter of them. They are
words of power. That is, they are understood to effect something when
uttered. Hence, while dharani is often just transliterated, it may
also be translated by certain characters which in turn have been
translated into English as "spell". This is the assumption behind
their use in the (subsequent) esoteric Buddhism, e.g. as "shingon".
The characteristic form of these, as was said, is on.......sowaka.
However this envelope is not always present in the lists of dharani in
the older sutras.

The mantra, on the other hand, is a formula used as a meditative
device, enabling a particular focus to be held in mind, as in the
formulae with Chinese nian or japanese nen (of nenbutsu fame). The
characteristic beginning of a mantra, at least in Buddhism, is namu
(Japanese form, but pronounced just as nam...). Pure Land Buddhists
are not familiar with the idea that the nenbutsu is a "mantra", but in
effect it is one. A wonderful collection of such formulae may be found
in the Sutra of Buddha Names (Butsumyokyo). These are not dharani.

The words of a dharani may have a meaning but often are arbitrary
strings of syllables syllables which suggest mysterious, supernatural
power. They have to be pronounced in order to work. The words of a
mantra on the other hand have a meaning. The frequent, but ignorant
use of the word mantra in English to suggest meaningless gibberish is
really inappropriate. (No doubt this is a lost battle as with many
other words.) In Shin Buddhism the meaning of the nenbustu has come to
be understood as being so profound that you don't even need to say it
at all, let alone "up to ten times".

Another ilustrative case: the Lotus Sutra has a chapter of dharani,
but the use of the title of the Lotus Sutra in chanting (Namu Myoho
Rengekyo) may be more properly thought of as a mantra. In so far as
the latter (the Daimoku) is used in some contexts, e.g. the Soka
Gakkai, to achieve this-worldly benefits, it could be said to take on
something of the character of a dharani; but that would be a secondary
phenomenon. It started out as a succint expression of the quintessence
of Buddhist truth, worthy of being called to mind through repetition.

This is rather more in the background of the question as directed
towards Shingon Buddhism (or Tendai Mikkyo), but perhaps it helps to
sort out the later confusions a little bit.

best wishes,

Michael Pye
Professor of the Study of Religions
University of Marburg, Germany (retired)
Visiting Professor, Otani University, Kyoto, Japan

-------------------------------------------------
From: "Janet R. Goodwin" <___@pollux.csustan.edu>
Date: February 28, 2007 10:43:07 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Query: Pre-modern postal system

The articles by Hotate Michihisa and Toda Yoshimi translated into English in Joan R. Piggott, ed., Capital and Countryside (Cornell 2006) discuss transportation networks between Heian-kyo and provincial locations during the Heian period.  Correspondence as well as goods traveled these routes. Toda (p. 251) discusses the "direct exchange of letters" between provinces and capital.  Couriers who delivered the mail no doubt did so at least in part on horseback, utilizing highways and changing horses at rest stations, if necessary.  Since goods were also shipped to the capital by sea, I suspect that some mail was delivered on boats as well.

--Janet Goodwin

-------------------------------------------------
From: "Joseph Elacqua" <joseph.___@gmail.com>
Date: February 28, 2007 12:00:37 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions...

Mr. Pye (and the rest of the list),

     Apologies for the omission!  The mantras/dharani that I will be studying (and was asking about) are 99% from Tantric Buddhism, so Shingon Mikkyo or Tendai Mikkyo.  It makes sense that the mantras tend to start with "namu" and the dharani following the "on......sowaka" pattern.

     I know this is going to sound a bit un-scholarly, but are the two sometimes interchangeable?  I ask because often in manga and anime I have found mantras straight from the Dainichi-kyo (Skt. Mahavairochana sutra), but they tend to be used as dharani.  I'm not implying that manga/anime authors know at all what they are talking about, but here is an example:

     On page 110 of Yamamoto Chikyo's translation of the Mahavairochana sutra, it says, "...Make a fist with the two hands and open the two middle fingers.  This is the mudra of Ksitigarbha's banner.  His mantra is:  namah samanta-buddhanam / ha ha ha vismaye svaha."  In the popular anime series based on the manga "X" (serialized in Asuka) by Clamp, a modern-day onmyoji (陰陽師) uses this mantra at least twice, chanting " on ka ka ka bisan maei sowaka."  Another mantra, "on batarei ya sowaka" is used similarly.

     This is why I ask the difference between a mantra and a dharani, but since onmyodo was a combination of Shinto, Taoism, and Tantric Buddhism, it's not too much of a stretch for an onmyoji to chant the Dainichi-kyo, so that can't necessarily be chalked up to a manga author who doesn't do their research.

     Thanks for any input you might have.

- Joseph P. Elacqua
(Graduate Student as of Fall 2007)

-------------------------------------------------
From Niels Guelberg <___@waseda.jp>
Date: February 28, 2007 15:40:35 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui


In the Shinto taikei version of Tonomine ryakki there is an oral tradition among the old monks that the whole mountain shouted banzai the day when Jito tenno visited the place (see http://www.f.waseda.jp/guelberg/ryakki/sht.htm).
It may be a late interpolation (the oldest text dates from 1519), because it is not in the GShR-version.

* The passage comes at the end of section F in Niels Guelberg's online edition. / Michael Watson.

-------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date:     February 28, 2007 15:22:10 GMT+09:00
Subject:     Classical Japanese Reader and Essential Dictionary
   
Here is an announcement from Columbia University Press:

Haruo Shirane, ed. _Classical Japanese Reader and Essential Dictionary_

In 2005, Haruo Shirane published _Classical Japanese: A Grammar_. Now, with _Classical Japanese Reader and Essential Dictionary_, he completes his two-volume textbook for learning classical, or literary, Japanese--the primary written language in Japan from the seventh to the mid-twentieth century. The text contains carefully selected readings that address a wide array of grammatical concerns and that steadily progress from easy to difficult. The selections encompass a wide range of historical periods and styles, including essays, fiction, and poetry from such noted works as _The Tale of Genji_, _The Tales of Ise_, _The Pillow Book_, _The Tales of the Heike_, and _Essays in Idleness_, and such authors as Ihara Saikaku, Matsuo Basho, Ueda Akinari, Motoori Norinaga, and Fukuzawa Yukichi. Each reading is accompanied by a short English introduction, a vocabulary list, and extensive grammatical notes, and ends with a comprehensive grammatical annotation.

The classical Japanese-English dictionary, which is the first of its kind, occupies the last third of the book. Drawing from the texts in the Reader, the Essential Dictionary features approximately 2,500 key words, giving multiple definitions and usages. This volume will be a vital tool for students, teachers, and translators of classical Japanese.

Table of Contents:

Grammatical Terms and Abbreviations

Part I. Base Texts
1. An Account of a Ten-foot-square Hut
2. The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter

Part II. Heian Period
3. The Tales of Ise
4. The Pillow Book
5. The Tale of Genji
6. Sarashina Diary
7. Collection of Tales of Times Now Past

Part III. Kamakura Period
8. Hundred Poets, Hundred Poems
9. Collection of Tales from Uji
10. The Tales of the Heike
11. Essays in Idleness

Part IV. Edo/Tokugawa Period
12. Japan's Eternal Storehouse
13. Narrow Road to the Deep North
14. Tales of Moonlight and Rain
15. The Tale of Genji, a Small Jeweled Comb

Part V. Meiji Period
16. Encouragement of Learning

Part VI. Nara Period
17. Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves

Essential Dictionary

ISBN: 0-231-13990-X
http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cup/catalog/data/023113/023113990X.HTM
http://www.amazon.com/Classical-Japanese-Reader-Essential-Dictionary/dp/023113990X

-------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Pye <___@staff.uni-marburg.de>
Date: February 28, 2007 16:41:09 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: A few weird Mikkyo/Buddhist questions...

Dear Joseph Elacqua,

I'm afraid I'm not well informed about the details of Tantric
Buddhism, the roots of which however can surely be seen in various
elements which came into use before there were clear schools, the
dharani being one. Similarly, mudra have a pre-tantric and a
non-Tantric history. It doesn't surprise me that mantra-type formulae
come to used as or in combination with dharani-type formulae. The
later, the less surprising.

You refer to Yamamoto Chikyo's translation of the Mahavairocana Sutra.
I can't look it up off-hand, but it would be interesting to know what
word he translated as "mantra".

Personally, I would certainly think of "on ka ka ka bisan maei
sowaka." or "on batarei ya sowaka" as dharanis.
The problem may lie in that the word "mantra", unlike "dharani", has
come to be used quite freely in English and may therefore compound the
close association which quite probably arose in Mikkyo.
I was just trying to explain the difference, since that's what you
asked about.

In the modern culture which has been drawing on mikkyo since the
so-called mikkyo-boom practically anything goes as far as I can see,
provided that it sounds a bit mysterious and helps people to do things
they couldn't otherwise do. At this level, you have to do llittle more
than make choices about which English expressions you find convenient.

best wishes,

Michael Pye
Professor of the Study of Religions
University of Marburg, Germany (retired)
Visiting Professor, Otani University, Kyoto, Japan

-------------------------------------------------
From: "Alexander Vovin" <___@gmail.com>
Date: February 28, 2007 18:22:25 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui

Sorry for causing misunderstanding. By chronology, of course, I mean
the chronolgy of a particular word, in this case banzai [baNzai], not
the chronology of the character spelling 万歳 that is open to
interpretation: manzai, bansei etc. are *different* words (albeit
roughly with the same semantics) using the same character spelling. In
order to be completely sure that the given word existed in the
language at a certain time, we have to have a phonetic spelling of it.
Buddhist (or other) texts written in Chinese are not going to provide
us any clues as to whether /banzai/ existed in *Japanese* unless they
have clear phonetic glosses either in man'yoogana or in kana. It will
be like citing a word in a Latin text circulating in a certain
European country in the Middle ages as a proof that it existed in the
local vernacular.
       Let me first address two Nara period texts that William
Bodiford mentiones:

(1) Man'yooshuu (MYS)
To the best of my knowledge, /banzai/ does not exist in MYS. There are
indeed two instances of the character spelling 万歳, both attested in
MYS XIII:

万歳尓 (MYS XIII: 3236)
万歳 (MYS XIII: 3324)

In spite of the character spelling both are *more than likely* to be
read as yo2ro2du yo2 ni, not as /banzai/ ~ /manzai/ etc. which can be
confirmed not only by the meter of the poems, but also by the fact
that native yo2ro2du yo2 ni is attested in the parts of MYS preserved
in phonetic spelling six times: MYS V: 813, 873, 879; MYS XVII: 3914,
3940, 4003. On top of that there are alternative semantographic
spellings of yo2ro2du yo2 ni such as  万代, 萬代, 萬世, 万世, sometimes
followed by locative case marker ni spelled phonetically, and
sometimes not.

(2) Shoku Nihongi:
As far as I am aware, 万歳 appears in this text four times. In SNKBT
edition it is glossed on all four occasions as /bansei/ not as
/banzai/. Oono et al. 1990 echo it with banzei (p. 1087). However, I
still fail to see any basis even for /bansei/ or /banzei/ in the Shoku
Nihongi, because positing any final -n /N/ for the Nara period is
hopelessly anachronistic, because we know virtually nothing about the
phonology of Chinese loanwords in the Nara period (see on these two
points my Descriptive and Comparative Grammar of Western Old Japanese
(Global Oriental, 2005), part 1, p. 59-62 and especially footnote 15
on p. 60), and because we simply have no phonetic glosses. We can
again claim that this character sequence can be read as /yo2ro2du
yo2/, but unlike the above case with MYS, we will never know -- see on
this an extremely witty (and unfortunately poorly known) chapter
"Kojiki wa yomeru ka" by Kamei Takashi in Kojiki taisei 3.97-154,
which can be applied to all atempts "to read" kanbun texts in
Japanese.

      I guess that the same case can be applied to Engishiki. I would
be grateful to any reference to a verse and line in Utsubo monogatari,
Hogen monogatari, and Konjaku monogatari where /banzai/ (or whatever
similar) appears in the original *phonetic* kana script and not as
ubiquitous 万歳 or as  furigana invented by a 20th c. commentator. My
prediction is that there will be no -n /N/ in coda position before the
end of the eleventh century (note: NKBT often mechanically writes
early Heian /mu/ as ん although at this early stage  ん (a soosho form
of 无) is just one of the syllabic signs for /mu/).

Heike monogatari, Noo, and Kyoogen fall outside of the period I
was talking about. Nevertheless, I will be very grateful for any
indication of the phonetic spelling of /banzai/ in post-Heian texts
(not just 万歳). I would be very surprized if Japanese lexicographers
missed something (they tend sometimes to put something extra into the
dictionaries, but rarely miss anything -- to give an example for the
last 15 years I have worked closely with OJ texts, I met only about
two or three ocasions when word is not included in Jidai betsu joodai
hen). The absence of /banzai/ even from Maeda's Edo go jiten (which I
checked today) is significant to raise some doubts (although certainly
not enough to kill the possibility that /banzai/ was already present
in Edo).

         Historically, of course, we know that 万歳 was written on
flags (万歳旛) used during enthronement ceremonies starting from the
Heian period. The main problem is: how it was read at the time?

Best wishes,

Alexander Vovin

============
Alexander Vovin
Professor of East Asian Languages
University of Hawaii at Manoa
----------------------------------------------------
From: William Bodiford <___@ucla.edu>
Date: March 1, 2007 3:44:32 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui * phonetic  spellings

Dear Alexander Vovin and everyone:

        ***At 07/02/28, Alexander Vovin wrote:


Sorry for causing misunderstanding. By chronology, of course, I mean the chronolgy of a particular word, in this case banzai [baNzai], not the chronology of the character spelling 万歳 that is open to interpretation: manzai, bansei etc. are *different* words (albeit roughly with the same semantics) using the same character spelling. In order to be completely sure that the given word existed in the language at a certain time, we have to have a phonetic spelling of it.


    Thank you very much for this clarification.  This is a topic about which I am very interested, but lack much knowledge.  It is my understanding that a phonetic gloss does not reveal the actual pronunciation, but only the way that the pronunciation was transcribed.  Thus, for example, the transcriptions "maze, manzehe, manzai" might very well all have been pronounced identically.  Once spellings become standardized (whenever that occurred), orthography and pronunciation tend to become ever less congruent.

    It is also my understanding that the chronology for the various phonetic glosses appearing in many old works such as Manyoshi and Nihon shoki (etc.) has not been established since the earliest extant manuscripts date from the Kamakura period (if not later) and in these manuscripts it is not clear which glosses might have been original and which ones might have been added by later copyists.    Similarly I always wonder if the glosses (rubi) in modern published editions reflect the notations in the original manuscripts or derive from reconstructions by the present editors.  Any additional information you care to provide on these issues will be appreciated.

    The edition of Dogen's complete works edited by Okubo Doshu, for example, is especially valuable because he conscientiously reproduces the precise phonetic glosses found in the medieval manuscripts he reprints.  Many of the pronunciations indicated in Okubo's edition differ from the ones that became standard during the Tokugawa period.  Thus, we have "Yosai" in medieval manuscripts and "Eisai" in Tokugawa published editions.  I know I can trust Okubo, but I do not know which other editions or editors are trustworthy.

    I will definitely add your Descriptive and Comparative Grammar of Western Old Japanese to my list of books to read along with Kamei Takashi's chapter "Kojiki wa yomeru ka."  I know from my own experience in comparing medieval manuscripts to Tokugawa published editions of Buddhist texts that the later kanbun readings frequently deviate from the medieval text.  I am not familiar, however, with any published systematic or sustained descriptions of medieval kanbun (or semi-kanbun) styles.  It seems like this knowledge is passed down only orally within seminars at Japanese universities.

        ***Alexander Vovin also wrote:


      I guess that the same case can be applied to Engishiki. I would
be grateful to any reference to a verse and line in Utsubo monogatari,
Hogen monogatari, and Konjaku monogatari where /banzai/ (or whatever
similar) appears in the original *phonetic* kana script and not as
ubiquitous 万歳 or as  furigana invented by a 20th c. commentator.


    It might be several days before I have time to compare the e-text with a printed edition so as to provide accurate references.  I will try to remember to do so and send the results to you off-list.

    Thank you for very helpful information.
________________________
William M. Bodiford (___@ucla.edu)
Phone:  310--206-8235;  FAX 310--825-8808
Dept. of Asian Languages and Cultures
290 Royce Hall;  Box 951540
University of California (UCLA)
Los Angeles  CA  90095--9515
.
----------------------------------------------------
From: "Peter McMillan" <___@parkcity.ne.jp>
Date: March 1, 2007 10:04:04 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: PMJS Peter McMillan

Dear Colleagues,

Could anyone help me with the following two questions

(I've omitted macrons so please do not worry about those.)

1. Which is the standard way to write titles:

1. Wakan Roeishu    with space and capital

2. Wakanroeishu      with no space and lower case for R

3. WakanRoeishu     with no space but with capital
Some other examples:
Hyakunin Isshu.
Man’yoshu
Gosenshu
Shin Kokinshu ShinKokinshu

Is there a consensus or standard way to write titles?

2.  Is there a consenus as to how to write the nanakusa in English?
As far as I can tell the second list is more accurate.

a.
15. The greens referred to in the poem are the seven herbs eaten at
the beginning of Spring:
seri                         Japanese parsley
 nazuna                    shepherd's purse
 gogyo                     cudweed
hakobera                 chickweed
hotoke-no-za            henbit
 suzuna                     Chinese rape
 suzushiro                  garden cress (arabis flagellosa)

b.
15. The greens referred to in the poem are the seven herbs eaten at
the beginning of Spring:
seri                          water dropwort
nazuna                    shepherd’s purse
gogyo                      cudweed
hakobera                chickweed
hotoke-no-za          nipplewort
suzuna (kabu)           Japanese turnip
suzushiro                daikon radish (Raphanus sativus)

Many thanks

Peter McMillan

As I only get the digest I would very  much appreciate a cc. to my
direct e mail ___@parkcity.ne.jp

----------------------------------------------------
From: Klaus Antoni <___@japanologie.uni-tuebingen.de>
Date: March 1, 2007 22:18:45 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Kojiki reading

Dear Colleagues,

first of all I want to introduce myself to this list. I have been reading the pmjs texts and discussions since quite a time, but this is my first own contribution. My name is Klaus Antoni, I teach Japanese religious and intellectual history at Tuebingen University, Germany, and am especially interested in Shinto as a kind of "political religion" in Japan. Since my dissertation 25 years ago, I am fascinated by the Kojiki, as a source book for the legitimation of Imperial power.

Interestingly a very well recommended publishing house in Germany (Suhrkamp) has begun a new series of scholarly books on "world religions" quite recently, and among others I was asked to make some contributions, especially a new translation of Kojiki (and Nihonshoki, but this is another topic) into German, with an up-to-date scholarly commentary. Later on, an introductory volume in Shinto in general is planned, too. But these are plans for many, many years.

Translating and commenting on the Kojiki is a fascinating task, and together with a group of highly interested students, I started the project in November last year. First of all we collected all printed editions and translations of the Kojiki available here, than we started to prepare a synopsis of those different versions, starting with Oho no Yasumaro's "Preface" to the Kojiki. But the more we got into the topic, the more it became unclear, what really to do, i.e. WHAT to translate. As is well known from Oho no Yasumaro's text, he tried to find a way to write down what Hieda no Are had "memorized" years ago. Here the first problems did arise, since it is nearly impossible to understand what this notion really means. As is very well known, for Motoori Norinaga in his Kojiki-den this was the crucial point in dealing with the Kojiki, since Oho no Yasumaro's notion gave him the argument to declare the written text, the Chinese characters, as comparatively unimportant.  The "true" meaning of the Kojiki he saw in the spoken language, as recited by Hieda no Are. Norinaga (re-?) constructed not only the way to read the text, but constructed an nearly separate narrative which he thought to be the original one. As we know, all of the modern editions of the Kojiki are more or less based on Norinaga's assumptions. Extremely interesting in this context is the version of Kokushi taikei, dating from 1940. Here the supposed reading of the text dominates the whole in a sense that the Chinese original becomes nearly obsolete. As a consequence, one editor, who also made the first complete German translation (1940, and then 1976), prepared a completely romaji version of the Kokushi taikei text, which is supposed to be completely "old Japanese" without any hint to Chinese characters (and connotations...?). I interprete this method as a final "purification" of the text from all Chinese, since the romaji wording is regarded as the original language used by Hieda no Are.

When looking on these texts it becomes clear that the Kojiki in modern times became that important only because of the linguistic constructions by Norinaga and his successors, not because of the original text. It were the ideological ideas and connotations behind the text that made it so important, and therefore the Kojiki could be taken as a modern text, too.
These questions are very interesting and important for the commentary, but for the first step to do, the translation, they create enormous problems. Of course one cannot translate on the basis of later constructions and interpretations, so one should use just the "plain" original, i. e. Chinese text, without any later reading. But is this the "real" Kojiki, that means that text which became so important in modernity? The Kojiki is translated today only because of its later interpretations and constructions, the plain text does not transport any such function.

It would be very, very helpful for me, and my students, if someone could give a comment or help on this complicated question. Thanks a lot.

Sincerly Yours

Klaus Antoni

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: March 1, 2007 22:54:34 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Japanese Historical Text Initiative

This seems an apposite time to forward the following announcement from
Dr. Yuko Okubo, Coordinator of the Japanese Historical Text Initiative.
**********************************************************

I would like to introduce our project, Japanese Historical Text Initiative,
housed in the East Asian Library and sponsored by the Center for Japanese
Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Please visit our project
web site at http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/jhti .

The Japanese Historical Text Initiative (JHTI) is a rapidly expanding
database made up of historical texts written during the last 1292 years. The
original version of every paragraph in every text is cross-tagged with its
English translation, making it possible for any researcher to see, on the
same screen, both the original and English translation of any word or phrase
appearing in any JHTI text.

So far, 12 texts are on our web site cross-tagged with English. These 12,
plus several others which appear only in Japanese or are in the process of
being digitized, are categorized as follows:

1) Ancient chronicles, compiled by officials of the Imperial Court

Kojiki (completed in 712)
Nihon Shoki (completed in 720)
Shoku Nihongi (covering the years 697 to 791)
Kogoshűi (completed in 807)

2) Ancient gazetteers, submitted by provincial officials with an Imperial
edict handed down during the first half of the 8th century

Izumo Fudoki (submitted in 733)

3) Ancient religo-civil code, a comprehensive compilation of religious and
civil law

Engi Shiki (submitted to the Imperial Court in 927)

4) Medieval stories - historical texts written about what was said and done
by powerful leaders of aristocratic and military clans during early years of
the emerging feudal age

ďkagami (covering the years 866 to 1027)
Eiga Monogatari (covering the years 794 to 1185)
Taiheiki (completed around 1371)

5) Medieval and early-modern interpretive histories. Between 1219 and 1712,
three great interpretive histories were written, mirroring the religious and
political interests of their authors

Gukansh˘ (completed in 1219)
Jinn˘ Sh˘t˘ki (completed in 1339)
Tokushi Yoron (completed in 1712) (in process)

6) Late Edo to Meiji historical texts

Nihon Gaishi (in process)
Meiji Bunka Zenshű (in process)

7) Imperial Shinto

Meiji Ik˘ Jinja Kankei H˘rei Shiry˘(only Japanese) (Governmental Orders
Concerning Shinto Shrines After the First Year of Meiji); important
religious orders issued between 1868 and 1945. - Japanese only
Kokutai no Hongi (Principles of Nation-Body, 1937); the official
interpretation of Imperial Shinto by the Japanese government.

8) Japanese Buddhism

Lotus Sutra (Kegon-ky˘) (in process)

9) New Religions

Ofudesaki (Tenri-ky˘) (in process)

10) Texts that will soon be digitized, cross-tagged with their English
translations, and added to JHTI

Heike Monogatari (Kakuichi-bon)
Yamato Monogatari
Azuma Kagami
Konjaku Monogatari

Since the building of this bilingual database is a collaborative and
never-ending project, we appreciate receiving recommendations for the
addition of other texts and suggestions for the improvement of our project.

Yuko Okubo, Ph.D.
Coordinator, JHTI
East Asian Library
University of California, Berkeley
___@library.berkeley.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Ross Bender" <___@rossbender.org>
Date: March 2, 2007 0:33:07 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Japanese Historical Text Initiative

In the spirit of collaboration, I would suggest the "Nihon Kodai Shiryou" online database at:

http://kodaishi-db.hp.infoseek.co.jp/

This database allows downloads of a wide variety of texts, which after decompression display as Excel spreadsheets. Some of the downloads are buggy, but the database does provide a very nice clean version of Shoku Nihongi, among others.

There is of course the question of provenance, as there are not as far as I can see any copyright notices attached, and these texts should definitely be checked against the standard printed versions. But they allow rapid electronic searching for terms which when used in conjunction with the paper-based sakuin can be very helpful.

Ross Bender


 -------Original Message-------
 From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
 Subject: [pmjs]  Japanese Historical Text Initiative
 Sent: 01 Mar '07 13:54


 Since the building of this bilingual database is a collaborative and
 never-ending project, we appreciate receiving recommendations for the
 addition of other texts and suggestions for the improvement of our
 project.

 Yuko Okubo, Ph.D.
 Coordinator, JHTI
 East Asian Library
 University of California, Berkeley
 ___@library.berkeley.edu


----------------------------------------------------
From: "Alexander Vovin" <___@gmail.com>
Date: March 2, 2007 7:37:24 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: origins of term banzai/wansui * phonetic spellings

Dear William and members,

      I would be more than happy to answer these questions. Let me
start from the second one, namely how we differentiate between early
and late glosses. Let us start from glosses in man'yoogana.
      It is very well known that Western Old Japanese (that is the
language of Asuka-Sakurai and Nara regions) had 8 vowels: a, u, o1,
o2, i1, i2, e1, e2 (the last one phonetically probably was a diphthong
[@i] (___@ standing for schwa), see on this Mori, Hiromichi 1991.
Kodai no on'in to Nihonshoki no seiritsu. Tokyo: Daishūkan. and more
recently: Miyake, Marc H. 2003. Old Japanese: A phonetic
reconstruction. London: Routledge/Curzon). This 1 and 2 are usually
known as koo-otsu (甲乙) distinctions. Even without going into the
details what were the exact phonetic values of these different vowels,
it will suffice to say that they were phonemically distinct, as nice
minimal pairs do exist, e.g. me1 'woman' and me2 'eye', ko1pu 'to
love' and ko2pu 'to ask, to pray'. Kojiki clearly keeps apart mo1 -
mo2 and po1 - po2, the former contrast is also preserved (albeit only
statistically) in MYS 5, but is lost in all other texts. The
distinctions started to fade away somewhere at the end of 8th c., the
longest one that survived (until Kokinshuu) was ko1 - ko2, but after
Kokinshu we have pretty much the modern vowel system consisting of a,
u, o, i, e that resulted from the loss of koo-otsu contrast.
      Let us take a hypothetical example. You are dealing with a
sutra that has man'yoogana glosses and you'd like to know whether the
glosses are authentic, going back to Nara period, or they are later.
Let's say, you have two characters, 子and 心 glossed phonetically. We
know that 'child' was /ko1/ with o1 and that 'heart' was /ko2ko2ro2/
with o2. Thus, ko1 of 'child' may be written phonetically as 古、故, etc,
while ko2 of 'heart' may be written 己、許, etc. Moreover, we know that
/o1/ and /o2/ could never co-occur within the same morpheme. Let's
imagine two scenarios:
1) 'child' is glossed as 古, 'heart' is glossed as 許己呂. In this case
your sutra has original early glosses which in all probability go back
to Nara period, at the latest to 9th c.
2) 'child' is glossed as 許, 'heart' is glossed as 故己呂. In this case
you have late glosses, because the scribe who added them no longer had
koo-otsu distinctions in his language.
      So far for man'yoogana. Let us now deal with katakana glosses.
By default they cannot be earlier than 9th c., because katakana does
not have any koo-otsu distinctions. But you also can date them more
precisely because several very drastic changes were taking place
throghout the Heian period, affecting consonants as well. One of them
is lenition of intervocalic -p- to -w- before all vowels that was
basically completed by mid-Heian. This lenition lead to the merger of
original -p- and original -w- as -w-. Thus, e.g. WOJ apa 'millet' and
awa 'foam' became no longer distinctive, as both were pronounced as
[awa]. Sometimes at late Heian -- early Kamakura -w- before /i/ went
to zero, and before /e/ it merged with -y-.
      Let's imagine you have in your sutra the character 帰 glossed in
katakana. The word was /kape1ru/ in WOJ. Several possible scenarios:
1) it is glossed as カヱル. Your gloss is certainly no older than mid-Heian.
2) it is glossed as カエル. Your gloss is certainly no older than very late Heian.
3) it is glossed as カヘル. In this case we cannot date it more exactly
than saying that it is no later than Heian, because it does not
reflect any mergers described above.
     Let us now look at manzai, maze, and mazehe. I would date them
in the following way:
1) マンザイ manzai: no earlier than the late Heian, because of  ン.
2) マゼ maze. Although the absence of -n may potentially look old, I
cannot think of a change /ai/ ~ /ei/ > /e[:]/ earlier than Muromachi.
3) マゼヘ mazehe. An extremely weird spelling. Off the top of my head, I
think I saw long [e:] spelled as [ehe] only in some Edo texts, but
since I am not an expert in Kamakura-Edo, I may be wrong here, and it
may be attested earlier. In any case, it deffinitely shows that the
merger of -w- and -y- before /e/ has already taken place, and the same
point as made in 2) is applicable. Thus, most likely Edo, but may be
Muromachi.
      This ultimately brings us to the first question regarding how
accurately phonetic glosses reflect the actual pronounciation. None of
the glosses done in the orthography of any language on the face of
this planet reflects the phonetics with 100% of accuracy, because none
of these systems represents IPA. However, if we take these
transcriptions not at their exact face value (like mazehe), but
keeping in the background the phonological history of the language and
its writing system, we can come to some meaningful (and not ad hoc)
interpretations. Certainly there might be cases when our judgement
will be limited by a number of factors. But ultimately, both kana and
man'yoogana fare pretty good, in comparison with, let us say, Turkic
words glossed in Arabic script with its only 3 vowels that are
supposed to render 8 vowels.
      About the notations in modern editions. In my experience, we
have rather colorful picture here.  In some editions, as in many NKBT
volumes, the editors replaced original kana with characters for the
ease of modern readers, but preserved kana script as furigana not
taken in parentheses, while furigana on the original characters added
by an editor is taken into parentheses. This may be pretty accurate
and *convenient*, but the original text loses its real appearance.
Sometimes this is not done, however, and there are all kinds of
graphic discrepancies between actual facsimilies and their modern
editions. The greatest discrepancy one finds in all editions is that,
of course, Heian period kana is polyphonic (with one syllable written
by different syllabic signs), and modern kana is monophonic, with one
sign mostly rendering one syllable or mora (of course, we have two for
the cases like kya or gya). The modern kaki-kudashi of Nara period
texts is even more problematic, especially in the more popular
editions that do not include genbun. But even if they do, modern
kaki-kudashi of even Man'yooshuu cannot be acurate, simply because
modern kana and even rekishiteki kanazukai does not reflect the
original vocalism of the texts. There are other obstacles, as well,
for example, modern kana え cannot possibly show any difference between
two very different syllables in the Nara period: /e/ and /ye/. Modern
kaki-kudashi becomes even more hazardous in case of kanbun texts like
Nihonshoki or semi-kanbun like many cases in Kojiki: it looks like an
ad hoc literal translation into quasi-Classical Japanese, which in
many times confuses things rather than clarifies them. E.g., I usually
marvel at the insertion of 以ちて into kaki-kudashi which is supposed to
correspond to Classical Chinese  以, but more often than not it is
ungrammatical in Classical Japanese and serves only one purpose: to
confuse the reader (:-). My personal strategy is like yours to consult
facsimilies in all cases when I have any doubts.
I am not aware of any studies that sift Mediaeval readings of the
characters from the later Tokugawa ones. Even reliable dictionaries
sometimes mislabel some kan-on readings as go-on. For a limited list
of characters (only those used as phonograms in Nihonshoki kayoo and
Kojiki kayoo) where kan-on and go-on are indicated absolutely
accurately, see appendixes to Marc Miyake's dissertation: The
phonology of eighth cenury Japanese revisited: another reconstruction
based upon written records. U of Hawai'i unpublished PhD diss., 1999.
It should be available through UMI.

Best wishes,

Alexander

============
Alexander Vovin
Professor of East Asian Languages
University of Hawaii at Manoa

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Sarah Thal" <___@charter.net>
Date: March 2, 2007 11:46:13 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Kojiki reading

Dear Professor Antoni and Colleagues,

Professor Antoni has raised a fascinating question -- one in which I am deeply interested, and one which has inspired me, as well, to make my first post to this list (after lurking in the shadows for several years). My name is Sarah Thal, and I teach Japanese history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I, too, am deeply interested in the development of modern Shinto as a "political religion" (to borrow Professor Antoni's phrase).

I would be delighted to see a translation of the Kojiki "pre-Norinaga." I like to work with the students in my historical survey class on understanding the significance of the Kojiki (and Nihon Shoki) in eighth-century Japan, then return to the Kojiki, in particular, in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Indeed, it is only this later "Kojiki" that may be the Kojiki as we know it today, but I think that there is all the more reason to give students and scholars access to what the Kojiki might have meant as a written text in its own time. Why privilege the "modern" Kojiki when a comparison between new and old could be even more interesting, highlighting the processes of creating tradition and the like?

Sincerely,
Sarah Thal

----------------------------------------------------
From: William Bodiford <___@ucla.edu>
Date: March 2, 2007 16:30:02 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Kojiki reading

Dear Professor Antoni and everyone:

    ****At 07/03/01, Klaus Antoni wrote:


. . . . Of course one cannot translate on the basis of later constructions and interpretations, so one should use just the "plain" original, i. e. Chinese text, without any later reading.  But is this the "real" Kojiki, that means that text which became so important in modernity? The Kojiki is translated today only because of its later interpretations and constructions, the plain text does not transport any such function.

It would be very, very helpful for me, and my students, if someone could give a comment or help on this complicated question. Thanks a lot.


    I wish to echo the views already expressed so eloquently by Sarah Thal.  The Kojiki is important not just in modernity but also as a historical witness to the early 8th century.  Moreover, I should think that it almost impossible to fully appreciate Norinaga's accomplishments (i.e., what the Kojiki became) without some awareness of the Kojiki as it was.  I hope that your work will help us gain access to that earlier Kojiki.  And I especially hope that you and your colleagues will be able to publish (either as part of the translation or separately) your analyses of the methods by which Norinaga and his followers transformed the Kojiki into a modern text.  It sounds like a very exciting project.  I wish you every success.

..... William Bodiford

________________________
.
William M. Bodiford (___@ucla.edu)
Phone:  310--206-8235;  FAX 310--825-8808
Dept. of Asian Languages and Cultures
290 Royce Hall;  Box 951540
University of California (UCLA)
Los Angeles  CA  90095--9515
.
_______________________
These statements are my own,
not those of the University of California.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Nobumi Iyanaga <n-___@nifty.com>
Date: March 2, 2007 17:00:20 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Kojiki reading

Dear Colleagues,

I am not at all a specialist of Kojiki and ancient mythological/historical writings, but I found today in a bookshop a book which has just been published, and which may be of interest for the problem discussed in this thread:

神野志隆光, 漢字テキストとしての古事記, 東京大学出版会 2007/02, 2,310 yen

The book seems to be written rather for general readers (it is in "です/ます調"), but very interesting.

I hope this is of some interest for you.

Best regards,

Nobumi Iyanaga
Tokyo,
Japan

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: March 2, 2007 21:31:29 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  New in paperback: Cartographies of Desire

The University of California Press  is pleased to announce the paperback edition of:

Cartographies of Desire: Male-Male Sexuality in Japanese Discourse, 1600-1950

Gregory M. Pflugfelder is Assistant Professor of Japanese History at Columbia University, and author of _Seiji to daidokoro_ (Politics of the kitchen) (1986).

http://go.ucpress.edu/Pflugfelder

"Extraordinary. . . . An indispensable work, there being nothing comparable even in Japanese."-_American Historical Review _
"Ground-breaking."-_Japanese Studies _

In this sweeping study of the mapping and remapping of male-male sexuality over four centuries of Japanese history, Gregory Pflugfelder explores the languages of medicine, law, and popular culture from the seventeenth century through the American Occupation.

Pflugfelder opens with fascinating speculations about how an Edo translator might grapple with a twentieth-century text on homosexuality, then turns to law, literature, newspaper articles, medical tracts, and other sources to discover Japanese attitudes toward sexuality over the centuries. During each of three major eras, he argues, one field dominated discourse on male-male sexual relations: popular culture in the Edo period (1600-1868), jurisprudence in the Meiji period (1868-1912), and medicine in the twentieth century.

Full information about the book, including the table of contents, is available online:
http://go.ucpress.edu/Pflugfelder

--
Lolita Guevarra
Electronic Marketing Coordinator
University of California Press
Tel. 510.643.4738 | Fax 510.643.7127
lolita.___@ucpress.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: March 5, 2007 8:11:25 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  JOB Announcement:  ASSISTANT OR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF JAPANESE

ASSISTANT OR ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF JAPANESE

The Department of Foreign Languages at Western Michigan University
invites applications for a tenure-track position in Japanese language,
literature, and culture, pending budgetary approval. The position is at
the rank of Assistant Professor or Associate Professor of Japanese,
according to qualifications, and will begin August 2007. Ph.D. in
Japanese or evidence of imminent award required. Preferred
specialization in pre-modern Japanese literature, culture, and/or
language. Applicants should have a genuine commitment to teaching
Japanese language, literature and culture at all undergraduate levels as
well as to research in field. Responsibilities to include supervision of
introductory level courses in Japanese. Candidates should be willing to
contribute to the activities of the growing Japanese program, including
the interdisciplinary Soga Japan Center and the interdisciplinary
Medieval Institute. Native or near-native fluency in Japanese,
competency in spoken and written English and experience teaching
Japanese to English-speaking students at the college level are required.
Experience coordinating a Japanese language program and/or developing
language teaching materials is also highly desirable. Western Michigan
University is a Carnegie Classification Research Extensive Institution
and en equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. The Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has placed Western Michigan
University among the 76 public institutions in the nation designated as
research universities with high research activity. For more information
about WMU’s Japanese language program, see
http://www.wmich.edu/languages/. Please send letter of application,
curriculum vitae, statement of research and teaching philosophy, and
three letters of recommendation to: Dr. Cynthia Running-Johnson, Chair,
Department of Foreign Languages, 1903 W. Michigan Ave., Western Michigan
University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5338. Review of applications will begin
March 12. Applications will continue to be accepted until the position
is filled.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Michel Vieillard-Baron <michel.vieillard-___@inalco.fr>
Date: March 5, 2007 15:32:50 GMT+01:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan

Dear PMJS members

We have the pleasure to announce to you that the long awaited
Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan (Joan Piggot, Ivo Smits, Ineke Van Put, Michel
Vieillard-Baron, Charlotte von Verschuer, eds. + 30 contributors) is now out !

This Dictionary of Sources of Classical Japan is intended to guide students,
scholars, and others interested readers to sources dating from, or with
relevance to, the Japan of the eight through twelfth centuries. It roughly
covers the Nara and Heian periods (710-1192). In other words, this work offers
an entry into classical Japan. Our guiding intention throughout has been to
make accessible a very large body of material that can in one way or another
contribute to our understanding of this seminal period in Japan's history. The
Dictionary contains some twelve hundred entries, practically all of which deal
with single sources, describing their contents and characteristics, and
offering bibliographical information on editions and available translations.
(From the Introduction)

Its price is 29 euros (+ postage). It can be ordered directly to the
distributor (the homepage can be shifted into English !)

http://www.deboccard.com
http://www.deboccard.com/Rub/Description.asp?NO=261625
Dictionnaire des sources du Japon classique. Dictionary of sources of classical Japan. Sous la direction de PIGGOTT (J.), SMITS (I.), VAN PUT (I.), VERSCHUER (C. von), VIEILLARD-BARON (M.). Institute des Hautes Etudes Japonaises (College de France). 2006. 577 p.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Henry Smith <___@columbia.edu>
Date: Tue, 06 Mar 2007 10:07:48 +0900
Subject: [pmjs]  KCJS: Janine Beichman lecture on translation

The Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies (KCJS) is pleased to announce the
third and last in a series of lectures dealing with issues of translation
from Japanese to English.

Lecturer: Professor Janine Beichman, Department of Japanese Literature,
Daito Bunka University, Tokyo

Title: "Through a Glass Darkly: Can Poetry Be Translated?"

"Poetry is what gets lost in translation" famously said the poet Robert
Frost. Equally famous, at least among scholars of Japanese literature, is
the translator Arthur Waley's comment that so much is lost in translation
that one must put a good deal back in. Different as their intent was, both
comments might be said to begin from the same sense of despair about the
possibility of translating any work of literature, but especially poetry.
Why poetry? Because it is so dependent on sound and form for its effect,
and of all elements these are the two that are most difficult to reproduce
in another language. Granted that no translation of poetry can show us the
original more than "through a glass darkly," I will show how even the
incomplete vision granted by translation can have startling effects. Then,
drawing on examples from my own translations of Ooka Makoto's _Oriori no
Uta_, I will describe some of the problems and pleasures encountered in
translating poetry.

Date and time: Wednesday, March 14, 2007, at 5:30 pm

Place: International Seminar House ("jPod") on the Kyoto University campus
(Yoshida Main Campus), immediately east of Central Administration Building.
See map http://www.kyoto-u.ac.jp/access/kmap/map6r_y.htm (labeled as
Kokusai Kouryuu Seminar House $B9q:]8rN.%;%_%J!<%O%&%9(B).

KCJS (Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies)
京都アメリカ大学コンソーシアム
Kyodai Kaikan, 15-9 Yoshida Kawara-cho
Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8305
TEL: (075) 468-8420
FAX: (075) 762-1889
〒606-8305 京都市左京区吉田河原町15-9
http://www.kcjs.columbia.edu
----------------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2007 00:37:57 -0800 (PST)
From: "Janet R. Goodwin" <___@pollux.csustan.edu>
Subject: [pmjs]  Workshop on Chuyuki with Yoshida Sanae at USC

The Project for Premodern Japan Studies at the University of Southern
California announces a workshop with Professor Sanae Yoshida, of
the University of Tokyo's Historiographical Institute, on
"Insights from the Chuyuki concerning Government by Retired Tenno"
(in Japanese) on Monday, March 19, 2007, 5-7 pm, in the Stoops East
Asian Library Seminar Room on the USC Campus.

For further details, see our website at
http://www.usc.edu/dept/LAS/history/ppjusc/ or contact Prof. Joan Piggott
at the History Department, USC, 213-821-5872.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: Wed, 07 Mar 2007 12:55:08 -0500
Subject: [pmjs]  North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources,Multi-Volume Sets (NCC-MVS) Awards

Dear All:

The North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources
Multi-Volume Sets (NCC-MVS) Project Committee is pleased to announce the following recipient institutions and titles of the 2006-07 MVS grant funding, listed below.

Thank you very much for your kind attention.

Sincerely yours,

Naomi Kotake
MVS Committee Co-Chair

TITLES FUNDED BY 2006-07 NCC-MVS PROGRAM

Institution   Title, Publisher & Number of Volumes                                        Date

Chicago   Igakushi kenkyū
              医学史研究     Medical School, Osaka University.  No. 29-86            1968-2000

              Mistsui Bussan Shitenchō Kaigi gijiroku
              三井物産支店長会議議事録     丸善.    Vols. 8-16                         2004-2006

Columbia  Shinpen Nihon zenkoku kajin sōsho.
              新編日本全国歌人叢書     近代文芸社.  71 v.                               1998-[2005]

Hawaii      Fujin gahō.  Microfilm ed.
              婦人画報.     臨川書店.  117 reels + 1 search CD-ROM                  Print on demand

Illinois      Nō kyōgen bunken shiryō shūsei. Densho no bu
              能狂言文献資料集成。伝書の部.    雄松堂.  14 reels                      2005

              Nō kyōgen bunken shiryō shūsei. Kyōgen no bu
              能狂言文献資料集成。狂言の部.     雄松堂.   20 reels                    2005

              Nō kyōgen bunken shiryō shūsei. Shiryō no bu
              能狂言文献資料集成。史料の部.   雄松堂.   6 reels                        2005

Ohio
State U.   Meijiki kankōbutsu shūsei (JMSTC) Dai 1-ki. Bungaku gengo hen
              明治期刊行物集成:  文学言語編.     雄松堂.  Units 85-94                1988-1996

Princeton Shimazu-ke monjo
              (Tōkyō Daigaku Shiryō Hensanjo shozō Shimazu-ke monjo
              maikuro-ban shūsei)
              島津家文書
              (東京大学史料編纂所所蔵島津家文書マイクロ版集成)
              東京大学出版会.  247 reels + 1 CD-ROM (index) + Kaidai                 2001

UCLA      Osaka nippō / Ōsaka Mainichi shinbun, 1876-1912
              大阪日報 / 大阪毎日新聞.  ニチマイ.  262 reels                             Print on
                                                                                                            demand
              Zenkoku hōgen shūran
              全国方言集覧.     太平洋資源開発研究所.  14 v.                            2000-2004

----------------------------------------------------
From: Bruce Willoughby <___@umich.edu>
Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2007 12:44:12 -0500
Subject: [pmjs]  Two new paperback editions

The Center for Japanese Studies at the University of Michigan is
pleased to announce a paperback edition of WOMEN AND CLASS IN JAPANESE
HISTORY and SHUGENDO.


WOMEN AND CLASS IN JAPANESE HISTORY
Edited by Hitomi Tonomura, Anne Walthall, and Wakita Haruko
Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies, no. 25
ix + 330 pp., ISBN 1-929280-35-1 (9781929280353), $26.00

"Every contribution is solid. . . . Having examined social fields
particular to women, the contributors take a fresh perspective in
revisiting the place of women in broad social, political, and economic
contexts."
 --David Howell in the Journal of Japanese Studies

SHUGENDO:
ESSAYS ON THE STRUCTURE OF JAPANESE FOLK RELIGION
Miyake Hitoshi. Edited and with an Introduction by H. Byron Earhart
Michigan Monograph Series in Japanese Studies, no. 32
xv + 306 pp., ISBN 1-929280-38-6 (9781929280384), $26.00

"A rich source for the study of folk religion in Japan, and Shugend˘ in
particular. . . . This collection is most welcome."
 --Paul L. Swanson in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies

"This elite religion, and Miyake's exposition of it, is rich and
learned."
 --George J. Tanabe, Jr. in The Journal of Asian Studies

Bruce Willoughby
Executive Editor
Center for Japanese Studies
The University of Michigan
1007 E. Huron St.
Ann Arbor MI 48104-1690
Ph 734-647-1199
Fax 734-647-8886
----------------------------------------------------
From: Mikael Adolphson <___@fas.harvard.edu>
Date: Thu, 08 Mar 2007 20:20:32 -0500
Subject: [pmjs]  Two new books

Dear Colleagues,
With apologies for the shameless self-promotion, I should like to announce
two new books that might be of interest to some of you. Both are published
by the University of Hawaii Press and should be available for a decent
discount at the upcoming AAS meeting.

1) The Teeth and Claws of the Buddha: Monastic Warriors and S˘hei in
Japanese History

Mikael S. Adolphson

Japan╣s monastic warriors have fared poorly in comparison to the samurai,
both in terms of historical reputation and representations in popular
culture. Often maligned and criticized for their involvement in politics and
other secular matters, they have been seen as figures separate from the
larger military class. However, as Mikael Adolphson reveals in his
comprehensive and authoritative examination of the social origins of the
monastic forces, political conditions, and warfare practices of the Heian
(7941185) and Kamakura (11851333) eras, these │monk-warriors▓ (s˘hei) were
in reality inseparable from the warrior class. Their negative image,
Adolphson argues, is a construct that grew out of artistic sources critical
of the established temples from the fourteenth century on. As the warrior
class came to dominate national politics, the s˘hei image gained momentum
and was eventually paired with the concept of │monk-warriors,▓ a term
imported from Korea. Only one s˘hei, the legendary Benkei of the late
twelfth century, escaped the criticisms leveled at the monk-warriors by
later observers‹not because he was justified in fighting as a monk, but
rather because he served the celebrated warrior Minamoto Yoshitsune, thus
reinforcing the primacy of the samurai image.

In deconstructing the s˘hei image and looking for clues as to the
characteristics, role, and meaning of the monastic forces, The Teeth and
Claws of Buddha highlights the importance of historical circumstances; it
also points to the fallacies of allowing later, especially modern, notions
of religion to exert undue influence on interpretations of the past. It
further suggests that, rather than constituting a separate category of
violence, religious violence needs to be understood in its political,
social, military, and ideological contexts. Monastic warriors acted no
differently from their secular counterparts and do not appear to have been
motivated by a religious rhetoric much different from other ideologies
condoning violence. The absence of such a discourse is as unexpected as it
is important‹particularly in light of current assumptions about holy wars
and crusaders‹indicating that other factors played an important role for
those who fought in the name of the Buddha. By tracing the use and emergence
of the constructed s˘hei images that displaced the historical Benkei and
monastic fighters, this work also offers an explanation of how and why the
invented tradition of "monk-warriors" became such a prominent feature in the
modern reconstruction of medieval Japan.

Mikael Adolphson is associate professor of Japanese history in the
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University.

 Cloth ISBN: 978-0-8248-3064-9, $36.00; 224 pages, 34 illustrations; 2007

2) Heian Japan, Centers and Peripheries

Edited by Mikael S. Adolphson, Edward Kamens, and Stacie Matsumoto

The first three centuries of the Heian period (7941086) saw some of its
most fertile innovations and epochal achievements in Japanese literature and
the arts. It was also a time of important transitions in the spheres of
religion and politics, as aristocratic authority was consolidated in Kyoto,
powerful court factions and religious institutions emerged, and adjustments
were made in the Chinese-style system of rulership. At the same time, the
era╣s leaders faced serious challenges from the provinces that called into
question the primacy and efficiency of the governmental system and tested
the social/cultural status quo. Heian Japan, Centers and Peripheries, the
first book of its kind to examine the early Heian from a wide variety of
multidisciplinary perspectives, offers a fresh look at these seemingly
contradictory trends.

Essays by fourteen leading American, European, and Japanese scholars of art
history, history, literature, and religions take up core texts and iconic
images, cultural achievements and social crises, and the ever-fascinating
patterns and puzzles of the time. The authors tackle some of Heian Japan╣s
most enduring paradigms as well as hitherto unexplored problems in search of
new ways of understanding the currents of change as well as the processes of
institutionalization that shaped the Heian scene, defined the contours of
its legacies, and make it one of the most intensely studied periods of the
Japanese past. Throughout, the widely deployed model of "centers and
peripheries" is tested as a guiding concept: It serves here as a point of
departure for a reexamination of the dynamic tensions among and between
literary languages, administrative structures, urban centers and rural
regions, orthodoxies and heterodoxies, the status quo and the pressures for
adaptation and change, and many other powerful entities and socio-cultural
forces.

An introductory chapter lays out the volume╣s four main points. The first
emphasizes the importance of the early tenth century as a watershed that
highlights the institutional and political transformations at court whereby
provincial governors were allowed more freedom and, by extension, greater
financial benefits. The second point problematizes the notion of a singular
dichotomy between center and periphery in Heian Japan. The various essays
suggest instead that the nexuses of power were in fact plural, and the
periphery was not as peripheral as had been imagined. Thus, rather than
conceiving Heian society as a static and one-dimensional formation centering
on Kyoto alone, it might better be understood as a society of multiple
centers and peripheries. The third point challenges the long-held view that
the central government╣s lessening of administrative control of the
provinces meant an increasing loss of power. Rather, the abandonment of a
strict administrative approach in favor of a more effective one allowed
elites in the capital to strengthen their hold on the provinces, reflecting
an improved integration of centers and peripheries. Fourth, the methods and
means of exercising power shifted from one relying solely on official titles
and procedures to one that was increasingly based on extra-governmental
means, a process of "privatization" that reflected the development of
multiple centers of social, political, and economic practice outside the
official structures of the state. Heian Japan, Centers and Peripheries
presents not only a set of new interpretations of this epochal moment in the
Japanese past, but also offers a host of new questions to be addressed in
future international and interdisciplinary research modeled on this
exemplary volume.

Mikael Adolphson is associate professor of Japanese history at Harvard
University. Edward Kamens is professor of East Asian languages at Yale
University. Stacie Matsumoto is a doctoral candidate in history at Harvard
University.

Contributors:

Ryűichi AbÚ, Mikael S. Adolphson, Bruce Batten, Robert Borgen, William Wayne
Farris, Karl Friday, G. Cameron Hurst III, Edward Kamens, D. Max Moerman,
Samuel Morse, Joan R. Piggott, Fukut˛ Sanae, Ivo Smits, Charlotte von
Verschuer.

Cloth ISBN: 978-0-8248-3013-7, $50.00; 552 pages, 22 illustrations, 10 maps;
2007

----------------------------------------------------
From: Morgan Pitelka <___@oxy.edu>
Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2007 12:25:17 -0700
Subject: [pmjs]  Tokugawa Jikki

Colleagues,

Most of us who work with Tokugawa materials eventually make use of
_Tokugawa jikki_ or _The True Tokugawa Record_. I'm wondering if
anyone knows of any plans to put this monumentally influential text
into digital/searchable format? Does an index exist?

I also was very interested in Beatrice Bodart-Bailey's paper (at the
2005 EAJS conference in Vienna) on the need to situate the Tokugawa
Jikki as a fragmented product of a particular historical moment
rather than as an objective collection of documents, which raises
serious questions about its largely unquestioned authority in the
field. Any comments or suggestions for further reading?

Morgan

*****************
Morgan Pitelka
Swan Hall S115
Occidental College
1600 Campus Road
Los Angeles, CA 90041
OFFICE: 323-259-1421
FAX: 323-341-4940
mailto:___@oxy.edu
*****************
----------------------------------------------------
From: michael wert <___@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2007 12:47:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Tokugawa Jikki

Here it is, do a search for "Tokugawa Jikki".  But I don't think one can do a keyword search within the Tokugawa Jikki using their digital copy.
  http://kindai.ndl.go.jp/index.html

  An index does exist: "Tokugawa Jikki Sakuin" (a worldcat search will bring up various sakuin for the Tokugawa Jikki including a bakumatsu sakuin and a jinmei sakuin).  I don't know if there is a digital version though.

  This is another useful database for Tokugawa docs (among others) run by the Historiographical Institute.  I often used it in the "Tokugawa" chapters of my dissertation
  http://www.hi.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ships/shipscontroller  (click the bottom link for a selection menu)

  Best,
  Michael Wert

-------------------------------------------------
From: "Graham, Patricia Jane" <___@ku.edu>
Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2007 14:57:50 -0500p>
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Tokugawa Jikki

I don't know anything about digitization plans for the Tokugawa jikki, but I high recommend Beatrice's insightful new book, "The Dog Shogun, the Personality and Politics of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi," for its critical assessment of this document, especially as it pertains to the fifth shogun and the role of Confucianism in the Tokugawa shogunate.

Pat Graham

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Patricia J. Graham, PhD
1641 Rhode Island Street
Lawrence, KS 66044 USA
tel/fax: 785-841-1477
___@ku.edu
----------------------------------------------------
From: Richard Emmert <___@gol.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 11:17:34 +0900
Subject: [pmjs]  Noh Training Project 2007

Dear List members,

This is a reminder that the early registration deadline for Noh
Training Project 2007 is coming up on March 15. NTP 2007 will be held
from July 16 through August 3 hosted by Indiana University of
Pennsylvania outside of Pittsburgh. For further information about
this summer's program see our website:
http://www.nohtrainingproject.org/. Inquiries should be sent to
producing director David Surtasky <___@nohtrainingproject.org>.

Again, apologies for cross-postings.

Rick Emmert
--
Richard Emmert

Artistic Director, Theatre Nohgaku (http://www.theatrenohgaku.org/)
Director, Noh Training Project (http://www.nohtrainingproject.org)
[also (http://www.iijnet.or.jp/NOH-KYOGEN/english/english31.html)]
Professor of Asian Theater and Music, Musashino University, Tokyo
(http://www.musashino-u.ac.jp/specialfeature/profile/pro_literature.html)

Home:
Hon-cho 2-27-10, Nakano-ku
Tokyo  164-0012  Japan
tel: 81-3-3373-0553
fax: 81-3-3373-4509
email: ___@gol.com
----------------------------------------------------
From: "Janet R. Goodwin" <___@pollux.csustan.edu>
Date: Tue, 13 Mar 2007 19:31:31 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: [pmjs]  Postdoc in East Asian archaeology, USC

List members,

I'm posting this on behalf of Joan Piggott at USC.

The History Department of the University of Southern California announces
a two-year post-doctoral fellowship for a recent PhD whose research and
writing concerns East Asian archaeology and its historical context. The
position requires teaching one course every semester, for the
Interdisciplinary Archaeology Major and other programs. In addition to
sustaining an active research and publication agenda, the successful
applicant will participate in the Project for Premodern Japan Studies' new
program exploring how history and archaeology can be used together to
better understand and envision Japan's past. Candidates with interests in
more than one East Asian realm--and in such topics as state  formation,
material culture, and urban archaeology--are particularly sought. USC
provides a rich environment in which to teach and do research on premodern
East Asia, given our active graduate programs, library research
collections (both at USC and UCLA), the East Asian Studies Center, and
associated programs such as the Project for Premodern Japan Studies and
the Kambun Workshop. Applicants should send a letter of application, a CV,
an exemplary piece of scholarship, two letters of recommendation, and two
syllabi--one for an introductory course in East Asian archaeology and one
for a more  specialized course--to:

Professor Joan R. Piggott, Chair
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship Search Committee
Department of History
University of Southern California
Los Angeles CA 90089-0034

Application screening will begin in early April.

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: March 17, 2007 0:18:11 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Announcing Virtual Kyoto Web Site

Virtual Kyoto Web Site
Teachers in Japanese studies will be interested to learn of a new, very sophisticated web-based project, Virtual Kyoto, that has just opened to the public.  It features a variety of material covering the history, culture and present of the city from its founding as Heiankyo in the eighth century.  The web site has recently opened to the public and is now accessible at the following URL:  http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/acd/cg/lt/geo/coe/index.html.

 The project presents reconstructions of ancient Kyoto, Muromachi-era Kyoto, Tokugawa Kyoto, and the nineteenth and twentieth century city as it was transformed into the city we know today. When fully opened the site will contain digital maps, reconstructions of the Shijo-Kawaramachi area over time, reconstructions of the Gion Festival, the Minamiza Theater, three-dimensional terrain models, and Kyoto ukiyoe data as well as a broad array of photographs.

A very richly illustrated, bi-lingual book – Japanese, with extensive English summaries – explains both the project’s development and its content in considerable detail:  Yano Keiji, Nakaya Tomoki and Isoda Yuzuru, eds., _Baacharu Kyoto: Kako, genzai, mirai e no tabi_ (_Virtual Kyoto:  Exploring the Past, Present and Future of Kyoto_), Kyoto: Nakanishiya Shuppan, 2007, 2600 yen + tax (for English language orders use ISBN number 4779501008 on the English version of Amazon.co.jp and the title is listed in Japanese on Amazon.co.jp for credit card orders; please contact ___@nakanishiya.co.jp to order directly by credit card from the publisher)

 At present the site is available largely in Japanese, but it does have some English language support and it is possible to navigate many parts of the site without knowing Japanese.  Even where users may not have Japanese language skills, since this is overwhelmingly a visual experience exploring the site can be very rewarding.
  The project is the product of the efforts of geographers, historians, archaeologists, art historians and other specialists and is the product of a multi-year Center of Excellence grant from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology and is the collaborative effort of scholars at Ritsumeikan University.
----------------------------------------------------
From: Michael Watson <___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp>
Date: March 18, 2007 19:24:28 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Traditional Japanese Literature

Announcement from Columbia University Press

Traditional Japanese Literature: An Anthology, Beginnings to 1600
 Edited by Haruo Shirane
cloth, 1288 pages
ISBN: 978-0-231-13696-9

"The editor has done a splendid job at this herculean task. What is particularly notable in this anthology is the variety of texts included "ancient gazetteers, prayers, sermons, works originally written in Chinese, etc. Many of the works here have not previously been translated, and the included bibliographies are also excellent."
—Joshua Mostow, University of British Columbia

Traditional Japanese Literature features a rich array of works dating from the very beginnings of the Japanese written language through the evolution of Japan's noted aristocratic court and warrior cultures. It contains stunning new translations of such canonical texts as The Tales of the Heike as well as works and genres previously ignored by scholars and unknown to general readers.

This volume includes generous selections from Man'yoshu, The Tale of Genji, The Pillow Book, Kokinshu, and other classics of Japanese literature, as well as a stunning range of folk literature, epic tales of war, poetry, and no drama. The anthology offers an impressive representation of dramatic, poetic, and fictional works from both high and low culture, along with religious and secular anecdotes, literary criticism, and works written in Chinese by Japanese writers. The wealth of classical poetry, linked verse, and popular poetry is accompanied by extensive commentary.

Traditional Japanese Literature is a companion volume to Columbia University Press's _Early Modern Japanese Literature: An Anthology, 1600-1900_ and part of its four-volume history of Japanese literature. Arranged by chronology and genre, the readings are insightfully introduced and placed into their political, cultural, and literary context, and the extensive bibliographies offer further study for scholars and readers. Including a wide range of classic and popular works in poetry, prose, and drama, this anthology presents a definitive overview of traditional Japanese literature and deepens our understanding of classical and medieval Japanese culture.

Contents

 Historical Periods, Major Texts and Authors, and Terms
Introduction
1. The Ancient Period
2. The Heian Period
3. The Kamakura Period
4. The Northern and Southern Courts Period
5. The Muromachi Period
English-Language Bibliography
Index

About the Author
Haruo Shirane is Shincho Professor of Japanese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. He is the author and editor of numerous books on Japanese literature, including Early Modern Japanese Literature: An Anthology, 1600-1900.

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/cup/catalog/data/978023113/9780231136969.HTM
http://www.amazon.com/dp/023113696X/

----------------------------------------------------
From: Florian Eichhorn <___@web.de>
Date: March 17, 2007 20:09:14 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Query: Pre-modern postal system

Hello,

As a starter, pp. 18-27 in Takahashi Zenshichi: Tsushin, Vol. 23 in nihonshi kohyakka, Tokyo (Kondo shuppansha) 1986.

Aoe, Hiizu: Nihonteikoku ekiteishiko. Tokyo (ekiteikyoku) 1882.
reprint 1928 as Dainihonkozushi,  by Choyokai Foundation.
A voluminous official work with extensive quoting of sources.

Ninomiya, Hisashi: nihon no hikyakubin. ?Tokyo?Osaka (Nihon fuiraterikku centa/Japan philatelic center). 1987.
ISBN 4-931239-01-3
(16th century- onward, pictured are many original envelopes/company handstamps/sources)

Bibliography (pre-1980 only):
Yoshida, Kageo: Nihonyushu bunkenmeiroku. Tokyo (Soryusha) 1979.

Various kinds of messengers, mounted or on feet using the horse-relay or station (eki) system, which started with the Taika reforms. Along the major highways, stations were designated every 5 ri, which had to keep horses for exchange. This was only on the main roads, not in the provinces. In later laws, this was changed and adjusted (Jogan shikimoku 871, revised in the Engishiki of AD 907). The centre of traffic was always with the residence, Nara, Kyoto or Kamakura. This was dissolved after the end of the Kamakura period and during the civil war period (1333-1573). Now any province or domain had a private communications system of the local reigning nobilty. We may assume that it was used for private mails of the aristocrats, too.
 For members of the other social classes, the only means of conveying communications to distant places was to sent an own courier, or to entrust the mails to travellers like merchants, pilgrims ec. With the pacification of the country by the Tokugawa, the centralized communication system started again, but as before, restricted to official usage.
As late as in the 17th century, private courier firms, bearing the popular the name of hikyaku (literally, flying feet), began offering mail services for private customers. These were scheduled services between larger cities, central hubs Kyoto, Edo and Osaka. Hikyaku used the station system along Tokaido and sideroutes as well. Hikyaku became finally abolished by 1873 Their personnell mostly joined posts/Inland Express Company. This was M. 5.6.- govt. creation to pacify hikayku. By M. 8.3.- renamed into "inland express company ", predecessor of the long-privatized NITTSU of nowadays. . The company was entrusted with all transportation business *except communications*, like money transport (wages), securities/postage stamps, packets ec. This is the reason for the late inclusion of these services by the Japanese posts in 1892 and 1900. Later on it became restricted to industry and very large unit services. The white-on-red "tsu" logo created by PM general Maeshima in early Meiji is still used on trucks/containers of nowadays.

regards
Florian Eichhorn

-----UrsprŘngliche Nachricht-----
Von: ___@k.meijigakuin.ac.jp
Gesendet: 26.02.07 13:44:12
Betreff: [pmjs]  Query: Pre-modern postal system


Dear List Members.

It just occurred to me that I don't know how mail was delivered in
pre-modern Japan. Evidently, mail was successfully sent over fairly
great distances during say the Kamakura period, but I don't know how
it got from one place to another. Mail  being sent around Heiankyo is
easily explained by household messengers, but long distance mail
requires a bit more. So, I was wondering if someone here can point me
at some articles or other documentation about the pre-modern Japanese
postal system. Thank you very much.

Barbara Nostrand

----------------------------------------------------
From: Karin L÷fgren <___@swipnet.se>
Date: March 17, 2007 20:47:14 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Query: Pre-modern postal system

Dear  Florian Eichhorn and all,

Thank you for your interesting notes on resourses about mail distribution. May I add some brief thoughts on the subject and perhaps someone who has better references available than me for the moment (I am changing location and my library is in boxes) can help out too. I think that even though a civil war were going on (1333-1573) mail distribution did not halt. Perhaps it did rather escalate! I say this because in this period we have the rapid development of dozo (private companies involved in money-lending, banking, changing rice for cash, storing rice and other merchandise to sell on in favorable time like stock brokers) and we see emerging (private) business in boat transportation along the coasts. 1300 is a too early date for this to happen but in 1500 these organisations and companies were fully mature (and giving everybody dependent on them headache). I have not studied private mail distribution but it seems strange if someone did not do business on this as well! My deepest apaologizes for not giving proper references on this subject but a quick search will show up with an ample litterature.

With best regards,

Karin

Karin L÷fgren
SAR/MSA Ph.D Architect
History of Japanese Architecture
KAD Karin L÷fgren Arkitektur & Design
and
Jordens Arkitekter AB
www.jordens.se
Helgagatan 36:10
118 58 Stockholm
Sweden
+46 (0)8 462 01 45

----------------------------------------------------
From: Peter Shapinsky <___@uis.edu>
Date: March 20, 2007 5:07:10 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Query: Pre-modern postal system

Hello all,

As someone who studies the maritime infrastructure of late medieval Japan, I
find this discussion very interesting.

However, I would suggest that we expand our conception of correspondence to
include oral messages.  Much written correspondence among warriors was
simply a summary of information related orally by messengers.

One useful reference, Yamada Kuniaki, _Sengoku no komyunikeshon_ (Yoshikawa
Kobunkan, 2002)

Peter D. Shapinsky
Asst. Professor of History
University of Illinois at Springfield
One University Plaza, MS UHB 3050
Springfield, IL 62703-5407
(217) 206-6595
___@uis.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Yasuhiko Ogawa" <___@topaz.dti.ne.jp>
Date: Mar 27 2007 15:19:00 +0900
Subject: [pmjs]  A new book on the Man'yoshu

Dear PMJS members,

I am pleased to inform you that I have published my first book,
_Man’yo Gakushi no Kenkyu (A Study of the History of the Classical
Scholarship on the Man’yoshu)_.

I considered the study and reception of the _Man’yoshu_ from the 9th
to the 16th centuries in their historical and cultural contexts, and
from a bibliographical viewpoint.

(I do not characterize its history as a scholarly development from a
primitive or immature to a present high stage.)

It consists of 16 chapters with 29 images, including the letter of
Sengaku, a learned monk in the 13th century, as well as Heian-period
manuscripts of the _Man’yoshu_.

I would be happy if you took interest in it.

If you need a copy, please contact me. I can pass on your order to
directly the publishers, Ofu, who can provide it to you at a somewhat
reduced price.

Web site: http://shop.ohfu.co.jp/i-shop/product.pasp?cm_id=102992

Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4273034298/

Yours sincerely,

Yasuhiko Ogawa

Professor
Department of Japanese Language and Literature
Aoyama Gakuin University
___@topaz.dti.ne.jp

----------------------------------------------------
From: Philip Brown <brown.___@osu.edu>
Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2007 22:22:41 -0400
Subject: [pmjs]  Japan/Asia Papers at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting

Dear Colleagues,

I wanted to call to your attention a number of papers on Japan that will
be part of the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers
to be held in San Francisco, April 17-21. The full preliminary program
schedule can be found at http://www.aag.org/. Among the papers to be
presented are three that deal with the Virtual Kyoto project I described
in a recent posting and an historical GIS of the Kanto (see *-ed items
below). Presentation dates and times are listed therein.

Please note that the preliminary program is searchable by keyword and
that there are also a number of papers/panels that deal with China,
India and other parts of Asia.

Best regards,

Philip Brown

*Resurrecting urban landscape of Kyoto during the Edo era using GIS/VR

A role of traditional local colors in urban landscape formation: a comparative study of streets having different regulations in central Kyoto

*Kyoto Virtual Time-Space: New Approaches to Historical GIS

*Restoration of Heiankyo using GIS/VR: Kyoto circa 8th-12th Century

Changing socioeconomic structures in Japan

Moving Past the South Korean and Japanese Governmental Impasse in the 1990-2006 redress movement for the 1930-1945 Imperial Japanese 'Comfort Women' Prostitution System: Strategies for Action?

The Kyoto Research Park and Innovation in Japanese Cities The Kyoto Research Park and Innovation in Japanese Cities

The Universal Consumer?: Selling Human Rights Rhetoric in Japan

In Daizu We Trust: Alternative Food Networks and The Soybean Field Trust Movement in Japan

Kunashiri-to (Ostrov Kunashir) - 60 years since Soviet Occupation

Politics of Multicultural Education and Production of Ethnic "Others" in Globalizing Japan

The Juvenile Curfews and the control of public spaces in contemporary Japan

Factories as Hybridizing Institutions: The Transfer of Japanese Lean Production to Poland's Auto Industry

Spatial Changes in Residential Segregation, 1995-2000: A Comparative Analysis of the Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo and Osaka, Japan

*Historical GIS of Japan's Kanto Region

1945 Map of Tokyo: Representing and Un-representing the Place and the Space for the Last Six Decades

Annual Maximum Floods and Typhoons in the Kanto, Kyushu, and Hokkaido Regions of Japan in the 20th Century

Japanese Transnational Workers with Non-expatriate Contract in Asian Cities

Time-series analysis of air passenger transportation networks in Japan 1985-2005

User-producer relation and knowledge production in Japan

Food Safety as a Factor in International Agricultural Commodities Trade

Ellen Churchill Semple and Japan

Restoration of Heiankyo using GIS/VR: Kyoto circa 8th-12th Century

Dugong v. Donald Rumsfeld: Cultural Properties, Legal Spaces and the Conflict over US Military Bases in Okinawa, Japan.

Okinawa: The Political Ecology of a Military Colony

No Space for Children: The Falling Birthrate And How It Relates To Women And Space In Japanese Society

New Policies for Land Consolidation from Market Liberalization in Japanese Agriculture

Reconstructing Satoyama: Metaphor and the Production of Agricultural Landscapes in Japan

Do Japanese fisheries cooperatives promote social and ecological sustainability?

The Fall Of The Fillmore District: Socio-Spatial Differentiation And Urban Renewal In A Multiracial Neighborhood

Rates and Forms of Tafoni Weathering from High-resolution Digital Elevation Data

Historical Land Systems in Japan: Knowing Time Through Space

Evaluating basins for salmon conservation across the North Pacific by assessing key threats, protected areas and current abundance and diversity

Colonization and Localization of the Landscape in Taiwan under Japanese Colonial Rule: Colonial Governance, Modern Science and the Environmental Order of East Asia

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Dix Monika" <___@hotmail.com>
Date: March 28, 2007 3:08:37 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  SOAS Workshop May 19, 2007

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce an international workshop, entitled "Seeing and
not Seeing: Visualizing the Invisible in Pre-modern Japanese Culture," which
will take place on Saturday, May 19, 2007 at SOAS, University of London.

For more information about the workshop please visit the following website:

http://sainsbury-institute.org/

This website will be up-dated in the next few days with a detailed schedule
as well as paper titles. We hope many of you will be able to join us in
London.

With the very best wishes,

Monika Dix and Robert Khan



                           Seeing and Not Seeing:
           Visualizing the Invisible in Pre-modern Japanese Culture

                Date:     Saturday, May 19, 2007

            Location:   SOAS, University of London, Russell Square

                       London WC1H 0XG, United Kingdom

This workshop co-ordinated by Dr. Monika Dix (Robert and Lisa Sainsbury
Fellow, 2006-07, Sainsbury Institute) and Dr. Robert Khan (Department of
Japan and Korea, SOAS), will be held in cooperation with the Sainsbury
Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures and the Department of
Art & Archaeology at SOAS. It will bring together scholars from the UK and
abroad to examine the ways in which pre-modern Japanese culture
conceptualized, described, and represented entities which could not or
should not ordinarily be seen; and how acts of viewing of such entities were
themselves negotiated and represented. The entities on which we shall
particularly focus will include deities and supernatural beings, the
imperial person, and representations of the visibility of women of various
social strata in traditional Japanese literature and drama.

The workshop will comprise one day of 30-minute papers and discussion
organized into panels, followed by a day of close-reading and commentary on
textual and artistic material of particular relevance to the theme of the
workshop. The principal literary genres examined will include pre-modern
court and religious narratives (monogatari, setsuwa and otogiz˘shi) as well
as popular folktales. Illustrated versions of such texts are found in
various formats including emaki mono (illustrated handscrolls), painted
screens and woodblock printed books.

We plan both to subject familiar, canonical works to new modes of analysis,
and to introduce less familiar, non-canonical, or de-canonized works for
scholarly examination. As a result, we hope to generate new and revised
iconographies of entities that were subject to viewing taboos, as well as to
show how such viewing was conducted and evaluated with regard to the
prevailing norms of scopic decorum, also including cross-cultural
comparisons where these may prove instructive.

The speakers will include:

From Abroad

Keynote Speaker
    Prof. Joshua S. Mostow, Department of Asian Studies, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

    Prof. Ishikawa Toru, Department of Japanese Literature, Keio University,
Tokyo, Japan

    Prof. Komine Kazuaki, Department of Japanese Literature, Rikkyo
University, Tokyo, Japan

    Prof. Ivo Smits, Department of Japanese and Korean Studies, Leiden
University, The Netherlands

    Prof. Doris G. Bargen, Department of Asian Languages and Literature,
University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, USA

    Prof. Keller Kimbrough, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures,
University of Colorado, Boulder, USA

    Prof. Susan Napier, Department of German, Russian, and Asian Languages
and Literatures, Tufts University, Massachusetts, USA

From the UK

    Dr. John T. Carpenter, Department of Art and Archaeology, SOAS,
University of London

Prof. Andrew Gerstle, Department of the Languages and Cultures
    of Japan and Korea, SOAS, University of London

Prof. Timon Screech, Department of Art and Archaeology, SOAS,
    University of London

      Dr. Robert O. Khan, Research Associate, Department of the
Languages and Cultures of Japan and Korea, SOAS, University of London

        Dr. Monika Dix, Robert and Lisa Sainsbury Fellow, Sainsbury
Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures, affiliated with the
Department of Art and Archaeology at SOAS, University of London

Respondents

      Prof. Richard Bowring, Department of Oriental Studies, Cambridge
University, UK

      Prof. Peter Kornicki, Department of Oriental Studies, University of
Cambridge, UK


Monika Dix, Ph.D.
Sainsbury Institute
404 Brunei Gallery
SOAS, University of London
Russell Square
London, WC1H 0XG
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (020) 78984465
Fax: +44 (020) 78984499
m.___@sainsbury-institute.org

----------------------------------------------------
From: Brian Goldsmith <___@yahoo.com>
Date: March 29, 2007 5:44:25 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Aristocratic lineages

Hello all,

I am currently doing research on the Fujiwara/Ogimachi-Sanjo clan.  I am attempting to establish the relationships between various members of the Sanjo, Sanjo'nishi, and Musha-Kojiro in the late fifteenth century.  Does anyone know of any particularly good sources for this?
Thanks.

Brian Goldsmith
----------------------------------------------------
From: Sharon Domier <___@library.umass.edu>
Date: March 29, 2007 10:29:22 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Aristocratic lineages

Brian,
If you don't mind using old fashioned sources (like books). You would probably get a lot From:

Fujiwara shizoku no seishi jiten / Chiba Takuho hen.
Tōkyō : Tenbōsha, Shōwa 62 [1987]

 Seishi kakei daijiten / Ōta Akira ; kanshū Ueda Kazutoshi, Mikami Sanji.
Tōkyō : Kadokawa Shoten, Shōwa 38 [1963]

But if you prefer to take your chances with online sources, you might check this one out. I will admit I didn't go digging in to see if your families are included. The font is much to small for my eyes at night.
http://keizusoko.yukihotaru.com/index.html

Or this one:
http://nekhet.ddo.jp/people/#jg

Best wishes,
Sharon Domier
UMass Amherst

----------------------------------------------------
From: "Scott Spears" <___@yahoo.co.jp>
Date: March 29, 2007 19:39:32 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Aristocratic lineages

One resource that helps me immensely as a starting point is Keizu Sanyou (系図纂要)
www.wine.wul.waseda.ac.jp/....

[Though the link worked for me, here is a shorter reference for Webcat.
http://webcat.nii.ac.jp/cgi-bin/shsproc?id=BN05691549
I've done the same below.
--pmjs ed]

Two versions exist in publication: a photographic reproduction of the original held by the Diet Archives (内閣文庫)and a printed character version of the same. The link above is Waseda's catalog entry on the latter.

Although I haven't used it much and cannot say much about it, there is also this:
www.wine.wul.waseda.ac.jp/....

http://webcat.nii.ac.jp/cgi-bin/shsproc?id=BN0323601X

Fujiwara Shizoku Keizu 藤原氏族系図.

You've probably already done this, but anything more in-depth on the individual lines can be found by starting out with Kokushi Daijiten 国史大辞典 and then working through their list of references.

Scott Spears
Waseda University (PhD program)

From: Michelle I Li <___@stanford.edu>
Date: March 30, 2007 0:35:37 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: SOAS Workshop May 19, 2007

Wow, the workshop looks great!  Unfortunately, some people, including me,
can't make it to London. Will the papers be available in some other form
(online)?

If it is of interest to anyone, I wrote about the relationship of women and
oni in terms of seeing and not seeing in my dissertation (Princeton 2000)
on reading the grotesque in setsuwa. I hope that my revised book version of
that work will be out by next year.

So, I definitely wish I could attend the conference.
Michelle Li
----------------------------------------------------
From: Carol Tsang <___@columbia.edu>
Date: March 30, 2007 2:37:29 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: Aristocratic lineages

You might also try Sonpi Bunmyaku. From my bibliography:

Sonpi bunmyaku. Shintei zouho kokushi taikei. Vols. 59–60. Ed. Kokushi taikei henshuukai. Yoshikawa koubunkan. 1962. Reprint 2001.

Carol Tsang
___@columbia.edu

----------------------------------------------------
From: Paul Rouzer <___@umn.edu>
Date: March 30, 2007 8:59:23 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  post on new classical Chinese text

To PMJS members:

Publication announcement: New “East-Asia-friendly” classical Chinese textbook

Within the next month or so, my introductory textbook of classical Chinese will be coming out from Harvard Asia Center Publications (through Harvard University Press). This is based on materials I worked on while teaching classical Chinese at Columbia and Harvard over the past 15 years. I thought members of the list might be interested, because I’ve tried to write a text with more “universal” appeal, though the learning texts are still drawn from the Chinese tradition (Shiji, Mengzi, Zhuangzi).

Unlike many textbooks, which presuppose a student with a knowledge in modern Chinese, my book treats the language as a “lingua franca” of East Asia, and so assumes that students of Korea and Japan (at least) will find it useful. There are no references to modern Chinese as a point of comparison for meaning or grammar, and it starts from ground zero (with no presuppositions about what characters the student knows beforehand).

Pronunciations of all the characters are given in Mandarin Chinese, Korean, and Japanese (Japanese pronunciations are supplied from a reasonable range of typical word usage derived from kanbun). Moreover, I’ve supplied an appendix of kanbun renderings of the lesson texts in romanized form, derived from the kanbun versions found in the Kanbun Sousho series (1920-22).

Feel free to contact me if you’ve got any questions about it!

Paul Rouzer
Associate Professor
Asian Languages and Literatures
University of Minnesota
----------------------------------------------------
From: Saowalak Suriyawongpaisal <___@yahoo.com>
Date: March 30, 2007 23:01:12 GMT+09:00
Subject: [pmjs]  Re: post on new classical Chinese text

Dear Paul

Thanks for the news.

Now I wonder if your book will be useful as  a reference for writing a Kanbun textbook?

Could you please also suggest any useful material?

I am trying to write an introductory textbook on Kanbun for Thai students.

Thank you.

Regards

Saowalak Suriyawongpaisal

Associate Professor

Chairperson
M.A. Program in Japanese
Faculty of Arts
Chulalongkorn University
Bangkok Thailand

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